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Manage anger signals and respond effectively

Chapter 5 p.9

w&t_question

I Ask

Angry? Me? No! I never get angry, at least I never show it, especially not with customers and colleagues.

Is there anything wrong with that?

w&t_exclamation

I Answer

The issue is not whether you show anger or not, but whether you know how to deal effectively with anger signals. The inability to do so often leads to destructive behavioral patterns and can easily let you end up in a guilt cycle.

What is needed, in Mike Matulovich’s terms, is real Elephant behavior in dealing with anger.

The diagram below contrasts the way in which the Elephant, the Ostrich and the Rhinoceros deal with anger.

w&t_ch5_n_responding_to_anger_signals

Four guidelines to manage anger and respond effectively:

  1. Address the problem.
    • Ask questions in order to obtain information to solve the problem.
    • Re-frame: What else could it mean?
  2. Dissociate from criticism and use a SMART action plan to solve the problem.
  3. Ask yourself what you can learn from this situation.
  4. Then let it go and forgive yourself
w&t_elephant

I Advise

Sounds to me as if some emotional awareness would serve you well in dealing with your anger.

Also remember the Issue Resolution model.

four levers of control

Four levers of control

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Simons Four Levers of Control

In this article you will find a question and answer style explanation of the four levers of control.

levers of control

Ask

I often hear people say that the company is on track. How do they know that? What mechanisms exist that guide the company, its people and its business to stay on track?

levers of control

Answer

As a fast growing company in an ever-changing environment your company focuses on the effective utilization of , as  R.Simons from Harvard Business School calls it, the four levers of control.

Within the company, mechanisms exist to ensure that four things happen effectively:

  1. Obtaining commitment to the purpose of the company
  2. Staking out the territory
  3. Getting the job done
  4. Positioning for tomorrow

For each aspect there is a lever of control to ensure it Stays On Track.

This diagram identifies the four levers of control and gives you a Holistic view of the dynamics of controlling strategy:

levers of control

Levers of control

simons levers of control

Ask

I can see that we are dealing with four sets of systems – the four levers – that work together to ensure that the business strategy stays on track. I recognise some of the terms, but can’t you give me practical examples that will enable me to get a better picture of what the Four Levels of Control consist of in our company.

simons levers of control

Explain

See the link with the symbols and the culture of the company? Remember the balance scorecard?

It’s a very useful diagnostic control system…and do you realise that the key result areas process is also a diagnostic control system for individual performance and career management.

Lets explore the What, Why and How of the four levers of control in the company:

LEVER 1: Belief systems

What:

Explicit sets of belief that define basic values, purpose and direction; including

Why:

To provide momentum and guidance to opportunity

  • Mission statements
  • Vision statements
  • Credos
  • Statements of purpose

LEVER 2: Boundary system

What:

Formally stated rules, limits and prescriptions tied to defined sanctions and credible threat to punishment

Why:

To allow individual creativity within defined limits of freedom

  • Codes of business conduct
  • Strategic planning systems
  • Asset acquisition systems
  • Operational systems

LEVER 3: Diagnostic control system

What:

Feedback systems that monitor organisational outcomes and correct deviations from preset standards of performance like:

Why:

  • To allow effective resource allocation
  • To define goals

How:

  • Set standards
  • Measure outputs
  • Link incentives to goal achievement

LEVER 4: Interactive control system

What:

Those systems that team player skills use to advance and develop.

Why:

  • To focus organisational attention on strategic uncertainties
  • To provoke the emergence of new initiatives and strategies
  • To ensure that the way we do business relates very closely to the changes in customer needs

How:

By ensuring that:

  • Information regarding changes in technologies, customer requirements, supplier strategy, competitors strategies and team skills are adequately and proactively incorporated into the strategy process
  • The chosen strategy remains appropriate to the business reality and overall company objectives
4 levels of control

Advise

Much of the How of Lever 4 is achieved over a cup of coffee through interaction during team discussions, and through listening to your customer…

Try some active listening and productive questioning techniques on your customer, you’ll be amazed at what you learn!

Thinking about changing careers? Read this next: What career is right for me

Free sample resume
Personalize the free sample resume of your choice
Welcome to our list of free sample resumes. Remember, after you have viewed the templates the downloadable MS Word template is also available for free, just click the download link next to the free sample of your choice.
1. Complete in depth resume
Free resume template 1:
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3. Summary matrix resume
Free resume template 3 :
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4. Summary resume 2
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5. Descriptive resume
Free resume template 5:
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6. Resume short form
Free resume template 6 :
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Freely use our sample resumes. Career Builder included the Microsoft Word version of each sample resume. Now you can just download a resume template and conveniently change the data to fit your personal resume. If convenient, we would much appreciate it if you could leave the referral text to Career Builder in the footer of the Microsoft Word documents.
Do a few self discovery exercises to get words describing you, these words will assist you when compiling your resume.Take the Tickle.com Free Personality Test to start building your library of descriptive words
Think like an interviewer
To write the best resume, is to understand how the interviewer thinks! We have used hundreds of books to help refine our interviewing skills over the years. The book we have gained the most from is Hiring the Best by Martin Yate:
Think like an interviewer, read the book Hiring the Best by Martin Yate:
More resume resources and extra ideas we found to be of great value:

Personalize the free sample resume of your choice

Welcome to our list of free sample resumes. Remember, after you have viewed the templates the downloadable MS Word template is also available for free, just click the download link on the sample resume page of your choice.

P.S. If you use the free Microsoft Word version, we would really appreciate it if you could leave the small link to our site at the bottom of the document intact. But of course we did not lock anything, you can freely edit the document to fit your needs.

resume image

The In-Depth Resume Version

Click here to view and download this free resume template

The Summary Resume Version

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The Matrix Summary Resume Version

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The Descriptive Resume Version

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The Short Form Resume Version

Click here to view and download this free sample resume

Freely use our sample resumes. The Career Guide included the Microsoft Word version of each sample resume. Now you can just download a resume template and conveniently change the data to fit your personal resume. If convenient, we would much appreciate it if you could leave the referral text to Career Builder in the footer of the Microsoft Word documents.

Effective team skills
Equip a team with effective team skills for maximum contribution
Chapter 6 p.1
You have often referred to Teams and Team Members.
What must I do to become an effective team member?
A team is composed of a number of individuals
working towards a common goal.
In the life of any team certain needs or problems crop up from
time to time. Sometimes a need for creativity arises;
issues arise that need to be resolved within the team;
different interests or points of view have to be reconciled to ensure maximum gain.
Equipping each team member with effective Team Skills will ensure maximum contribution by each member to the team process and ensure that the team adds maximum value to the customer and other stakeholders … And ultimately adds value to themselves.
Once again we present a MIND MAP to guide us on a journey through the most important principles which effective team members should master.
Remember however that an understanding of all the other skills described in this book are essential for the effective operation of teams.
Effective team skills:
The Issue Resolution model
The Six Thinking Hats
Win-Win Negotiation for maximum joint gain
Common problems with meetings
Conflict management
Creative and objective problem solving
Decision making model

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team player skills

Effective Team Player Skills

Equip team members with effective team player skills for maximum contribution

(See also: Seven habits of highly successful people)

Effective team skills

This info sheet work in a question and answer fashion. First we ask the most common question on team player skills and then provide answers with detailed explanations.

team player skills

Ask

You have often referred to Teams and Team Members.

What must I do to become an effective team member?

team member skills

Answer

A team is composed of a number of individuals working towards a common goal.

In the life of any team certain needs or problems crop up from time to time. Sometimes a need for creativity arises, issues arise that need to be resolved within the team, different interests or points of view have to be reconciled to ensure maximum gain.

effective team working skills

Effective Team Working Skills

Equipping each team member with effective team skills will ensure maximum contribution by each member to the team process and ensure that the team adds maximum value to the customer and other stakeholders … And ultimately adds value to themselves.

effective team member

Explain

We provide a list of effective team member skills below to guide you on a journey through the most important principles that effective team members should master.

An understanding of all the other skills mentioned below are essential for the effective operation of teams.

Effective team skills

Interpersonal skills
Effective interpersonal skills are based on effective communication
Chapter 5
p.1
I am of the opinion that the way I get along with my colleagues is very important for my success. What can you teach me about interpersonal skills?
You are right – this is a critical aspect of success. Effective interpersonal skills in your business life as well as your personal life are based on effective communication.
Your contribution and value-add depend in large measure upon your ability to communicate effectively with customers and team members, understanding their behavior and upon the nature of the relationship you maintain with them.
Equally important is your own self-awareness of how you respond to others and how you are perceived by your customers and team members.
This section of the book deals with the various tools and concepts that will assist you in managing Interpersonal relationships.
But first – let’s study the Mindmap.
Apply the process of Actions & Results rather than Analysis & Understanding.
Use your great personal capacity and gain in understanding of how and where you do your best work while you work; avoid focusing on analyzing yourself and once you understand you will do something. Take action and learn as you do, rather than analyzing, trying to understand and then doing.
Interpersonal skills:
7 habits of highly effective people
Growing the arena – The Johari window
Stimulus and response
Association and Dissociation
Finding common ground
Understanding DISC profiles
Feedback gap:
Stimulus and response
Responding to anger signals
Effective questioning
Productive listening
Association and dissociation

Effective interpersonal skills are based on effective communication

Chapter 5 p.1

w&t_question

I Ask

I am of the opinion that the way I get along with my colleagues is very important for my success. What can you teach me about interpersonal skills?

w&t_exclamation

I Answer

You are right – this is a critical aspect of success. Good interpersonal skills in your business life as well as your personal life are based on effective communication.

Your contribution and value-add depend in a large measure on your ability to communicate effectively with customers and team members; understanding their behavior and respecting the nature of your relationship.

Equally important is your own self-awareness of how you respond to others and how you are perceived by your customers and team members.

w&t_binoculars

I Explain

This section of the book deals with the various tools and concepts that will assist you in managing interpersonal relationships.

But first – let’s study the Mindmap.

Apply the process of Actions & Results rather than Analysis & Understanding.

Use your great personal capacity and gain in understanding of how and where you do your best work; avoid focusing on analyzing yourself and thinking that once you understand yourself you will do something.

Take action and learn as you do, rather than analyzing, trying to understand and then doing.

Interpersonal skills

Close the Feedback gap

Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective people
Chapter 5
p.2
What is the “7 Habits of Highly Effective people”, I often hear people referring to it? Can you tell me what it is all about? Can I apply these habits and concepts in business?
By following the ‘7 Habits of Highly Effective people’, you can enhance your performance in all aspects of life and will definitely contribute to greater success in business.
It is all about creating a Win-Win mind set and way of life. The diagram below will explain the following aspects:
What the 7 Habits of Highly Effective people entail.
The core principles underlying each of the seven habits.
The relationship between the seven habits and the dependency continuum.
Thank you to:
Franklin Covey for
“The 7 Habits of
Highly Effective People”.
First principle of the 7 Habits of Highly Effective people
1.
Core principle:
Be pro-active, by applying self-knowledge and self-awareness in order to be able to choose your response.
Second principle of the 7 Habits of Highly Effective people
2.
Core principle:
Self-awareness, personal vision and responsibility. Begin with the end in mind, by applying imagination and conscience.
Third principle of the 7 Habits of Highly Effective people
3.
Core principle:
Leadership and having a mission.
Put first things first by applying will-power.
Fourth principle of the 7 Habits of Highly Effective people
4.
Core principle:
Managing time and priorities around roles and goals. Think Win-Win by adopting an abundance mentality.
Fifth principle of the 7 Habits of Highly Effective people
5.
Core principle:
Seeking mutual benefit.Seek first to understand, then to be understood by applying courage balanced by consideration.
Sixth principle of the 7 Habit of Highly Effective people
6.
Core principle:
Empathetic communication. “Sharpen the saw” through continuous improvement of
Self-renewal.
Seventh principle of the 7 Habits of Highly Sffective people
7.
Core principle:
Continuous involvement.
Interdependence – ‘WE’ paradigm:
We can do it.
We can co-operate.
We can combine our talents and abilities and create something greater together.
Interdependent people combine their own efforts with the efforts of others to achieve their greatest success. As an interdependent person, I have the opportunity to share myself and meaningfully with others, and have access to the vast resources and potential of other human beings.
Independence – ‘I’ paradigm:
I can do it.
I am responsible.
I am self reliant.
I can choose.
Independent people will strive to get what they want through their own efforts.
Dependence – ‘YOU’ paradigm: You take care of me.
You come through for me.
I blame you for the results.
Dependent people need others to get what they want.
How do I go about growing interdependence?
Growing interdependence depends upon building trust in relationships. Think of building trust as making deposits into an Emotional Bank Account.
The more deposits you make, the more reserves you accumulate.
Good awareness
The Emotional Bank Account:
Keeping commitments
Keeping a commitment or a promise is a major deposit, breaking one is a major withdrawal.
Understanding the individual
Really seeking to understand another person is probably one of the most important deposits we can make, and it is the key to every other deposit.
Attending to the little things
The little kindnesses and courtesies are very important. Small discourtesies, a little unkindness, little forms of disrespect make large withdrawals. In relationships, the little things are the big things.
Apologizing sincerely when we make a withdrawal
When we make withdrawals from the emotional bank account, we need to apologize and we need to do it sincerely. Great deposits come in the sincere words:
“I was wrong.”
“That was unkind of me.”
“I showed you no respect.”
“I gave you no dignity, and I’m deeply sorry.”
It takes a great deal of character and strength to apologize quickly out of one’s heart rather than out of pity.
When we truly love others without condition, without strings, we help them feel secure and safe and validated and affirmed in essential worth, identity, and integrity. Their natural growth process is encouraged. We make it easier for them to live the laws of life – co-operation, contribution, self-discipline, integrity and to discover and live true to the highest and best within them.
“If I have a habit of showing discourtesy, disrespect, cutting you off, overreacting, ignoring you, becoming arbitrary, betraying your trust, threatening you, or playing little tin god in your life, my Emotional Bank Account will eventually be overdrawn.
The trust level will become very low. What flexibility do I then have?”

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Seven habits of highly successful people

Seven habits of highly successful people

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Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective people

About this article:

  • 7 Habits of highly effective people explained in question and answer style
  • More Google search resources

The 7 habits of highly effective people discussed in question and answer style.

7 habit of highly effective people

Ask

What are the seven habits of highly effective people, I often hear people referring to it? Can you tell me what it is all about? Can I apply these 7 habits and concepts in business?

7 habits of highly effective people covey

Answer

By following Covey’s 7 habits, you can enhance your performance in all aspects of life and will definitely contribute to greater success in business.

Steven Covey Core Principles

First principle of the 7 habits

Second principle of the seven habits

  • Self-awareness, personal vision and responsibility. Start with the end in mind, by applying your imagination and conscience. (see: goal setting smart)

Third principle of Covey’s habits

Fourth principle of Stephen Covey’s habits

  • Managing time and priorities around roles and goals. Think Win-Win by adopting an abundance mentality. (see: long term career goals) HERE

Fifth principle of the 7 good habits

Sixth principle of the seven habits

Seventh principle of the seven habits of highly effective people

  • Continuous involvement.

It is all about creating a Win-Win situation as a way of life.

The diagram below will explain the following aspects:

  • What the seven habits of highly effective people entail.
  • The core principles underlying each of the seven habits.
  • The relationship between the 7 habits and the dependency relationship.
  • [adrotate banner=”15″]
the 7 habits of highly effective people

The 7 habits of highly effective people

Thank you to: Stephen R  Covey for The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.

Interdependence – ‘WE’ paradigm

  • We can do it.
  • We can co-operate.
  • We can combine our talents and abilities and create something greater together.

Interdependent people combine their efforts with the efforts of others to achieve their greatest success. As an interdependent person, I have the opportunity to share myself meaningfully with others, and have access to the vast resources and potential of other human beings.

Independence – ‘I’ paradigm

  • I can do it.
  • I am responsible.
  • I am self reliant.
  • I can choose.

Independent people will strive to get what they want through their own efforts.

Dependence – ‘YOU’ paradigm

  • You take care of me.
  • You come through for me.
  • I blame you for the results.

Dependent people need others to get what they want.

the 7 habits

Ask

How do I go about growing interdependence?

seven habits of highly effective people stephen covey

Answer

Growing interdependence depends upon building trust in relationships. Think of building trust as making deposits into an Emotional Bank Account (explained below).

The more deposits you make, the more reserves you accumulate.

Good awareness

The Emotional Bank Account

Keeping commitments

Keeping a commitment or a promise is a major deposit, breaking one is a major withdrawal.

Understanding the individual

Really seeking to understand another person is probably one of the most important deposits we can make, and it is the key to every other deposit.

Attending to the little things

The little kindnesses and courtesies are very important. Small discourtesies, a little unkindness, little forms of disrespect make large withdrawals. In relationships, the little things are the big things.

Apologizing sincerely when we make a withdrawal

When we make withdrawals from the emotional bank account, we need to apologize and we need to do it sincerely. Great deposits come from the sincere words:

“I was wrong”

“That was unkind of me”

“I didn’t show you respect”

“I gave you no dignity, and I’m deeply sorry”

It takes a great deal of character and strength to apologize sincerely.

When we truly love others without condition, without strings; we help them feel secure, safe, validated and affirmed in their essential worth, identity and integrity. Their natural growth process is encouraged. We make it easier for them to follow the laws of life: co-operation, contribution, self-discipline and integrity. Love encourages to discover and live true to your highest and best.

7 habits of highly effective people pdf

Advise

If I have a habit of showing discourtesy, disrespect, cutting you off, overreacting, ignoring you, becoming arbitrary, betraying your trust, threatening you, or playing little tin god in your life,  my Emotional Bank Account will eventually be overdrawn.

The trust level will become very low. What flexibility do I then have?

7 habit of highly effective people

7 habit of highly effective people

Wondering if you should change careers? Read this: What career is right for me

How to write a resume
How to write a resume and the Continuous Resumes® process
Welcome to the how to write a resume page, a step by step process for building your resume as well as free resume samples to get you started.
Career Builder has worked through in excess of four thousand resumes and cover letters over the past ten years. We have recruited more than five hundred people in our own companies as well as many other companies. There are many ways one can use a resume to build a career, other than landing a job.
Use our Working Resume process to inform those around you and shape your career. We share these processes with you; help us develop them further by telling us how you used them and what happened. On Career Builder you will find tested ways to develop your career using your resume, as well as straightforward guidelines on what recruiters are looking for in a resume and what information a cover letter could contain.
Before you start building your resume, you have to
Get this free report!
The first section of this page consists of how to write a resume, the second part consists of a process we have developed and use in our own companies, the Working Resume process. Use our resume writing tips to build a working resume. If you need more examples visit our free sample resume page.
Where would you like to go:
How to write a resume
How to write a resume the way the interviewer prefers it and resume writing tips
Working Resume
Use this process to inform others and build your career
The mind of the interviewer
Know what the interviewer will focus on before the interview and when writing your resume
How to write a resume
When writing a resume one wants a whole library of words describing the unique individual that is you. We recommend you do a few self discovery exercises to get information on how you do your best work and how to best describe yourself to the interviewer. Remember the interviewer wants to get to know you and how you made choices in the past. Here are two such exercises to get you started:
Tickle.com Free Personality Test
Take the FREE MAPP Assessment
Here is a chronological order on how to write a resume. Most recruiters expect a resume format similar to this:
Personal details
Resume cover letter
Detail on your high school years
Detail on your tertiary education
Summary-map of your skills
Summary-map of your job experience
More specific job information
Starting with your most recent job
Second last
Third last
Etcetera.
Remuneration
Resume reference page
Resume writing is a great opportunity to talk about you. Go with your personal gut feeling on how to make your resume flow. Remember to keep the focus on you and the choices you made in your career, why you made those choices and what you learned from them. Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.
Personal details
Include the normal personal details in your resume. Include everything the recruiter might need to get in contact with you, for example a mobile number as well as a number for a land line. In our how to write a resume section we do not include a list of all the specific personal details required. Go through our free sample resume page to get an idea of what is expected.
Include all personal information that is necessary; be careful to include too much detail. The resume is about you and your choices; be wary to do damage to your resume by placing too much focus on other information contained in your resume. As we said earlier, we do not include a detailed list in the how to write a resume section, visit our free resume templates and free sample resume page for examples on detailed personal details.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.
back to table of content
Resume cover letter
Most recruiters expect a resume cover letter at this position in the chronological order of your resume, not necessarily before the resume itself. A cover letter’s job is to briefly introduce your resume and then answer the following questions:
I apply for this job opening because…
I believe I can do this job because…
I want this job because…
You can have two approaches in writing your resume cover letter. The first cover letter approach is one focused on the company and the specific job opening. Shape your cover letter to fit the requirements of the job opening. We do not build on this strategy much in our how to write a resume information, recruiters prefer the second option…
The second approach is to write a general cover letter. This cover letter is focused on you and your achievements, your major choices in life and how they fit with the career opportunity presenting itself.
Most recruiters prefer the second option. It is perceived as more natural and they get to know you as an individual. In how to write a resume, we use the second option throughout our guidelines on resumes.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.
back to table of content
Detail on your high school years
In your resume one will include the normal high school detail. For example:
Where did you finish high school?
Which subjects did you have in your last year?
What were your symbols?
Include your symbols here as well, even though it is on your school certificate. It makes reading your resume easier for the recruiter.
Which sport did you do in school?
Which extracurricular activities did you participate in?
You have now given a summary of your last year of school. Now let’s drill into this information a bit, for the benefit of the recruiter reading your resume. Remember recruiters want to get to know you. The central theme of your resume should be the choices you made in your life. This is the biggest indication of who you are and how you will or won’t fit with the career opportunity presented. For this kind of drilling down information gathering ask yourself questions like:
Why did I select the subjects I did in school?
Which subjects did you enjoy and which subjects did you not enjoy?
Why did you enjoy the subjects you did?
Why did you not enjoy the other subjects?
Why did I choose to take part in sport?
Which sport did I enjoy and which not?
Why did I enjoy certain sports and other not?
Was I captaining my team?
If you were a leader of some kind, how did it come about and did you enjoy it or not and why?
Ask the same questions about your extracurricular activities. Note that the questions we have listed we use frequently in our how to write a resume process and resume coaching , if you wish to expand a bit on these questions feel free to do so. Let us know which questions worked for you, if you need more help writing your resume contact one of our experts.
Keep your resume focused on who you are and the choices you made, why you made them and what you learned from them. Recruiters want to get to know you as an individual, understanding the choices you made can assist them in making a more informed decision. how to write a resume gives you the tools to build a resume that talks to the recruiters. Being thorough in your presentation of self puts you leagues ahead of the rest!
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.
back to table of content
Detail on your tertiary education
Do a few self discovery exercises to get words describing you, these words will assist you when compiling your resume.Take the Tickle.com Free Personality Test to start building your library of descriptive words
In your resume one will include the normal tertiary education detail. For example:
Which university did you go to?
Which subjects did you have?
What were your symbols?
Include your symbols here as well, even though it is on your degree. It makes reading your resume easier for the recruiter.
Which sport did you take part in?
What else did you do at university?
You have now given a summary of your tertiary education. Now let’s drill into this information a bit for the benefit of the recruiter reading your resume. Remember recruiters want to get to know you. The central theme of your resume should be the choices you made in your life; this is our focus on how to write a resume, telling the recruiter your story. Your choices are the biggest indication of who you are and how you will or won’t fit with the career opportunity presented. For this kind of drilling down information gathering ask yourself questions like:
Why did I choose the direction I did?
Which subjects did you enjoy and which subjects did you not enjoy?
Why did you enjoy the subjects you did?
Why did you not enjoy the other subjects?
Why did I choose to take part in sport?
Why did I enjoy certain sports and others not?
Was I captaining my team?
If you were a leader of some kind, how did it come about and did you enjoy it or not and why?
Ask the same questions concerning your other activities at university.
Keep your resume focused on who you are and the choices you made, why you made them and what you learned from them. Recruiters want to get to know you as an individual, understanding the choices you made can assist them in making a more informed choice. Being thorough in your presentation of self puts you leagues ahead of the rest!
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.
back to table of content
Summary map of your skills
Add the summary map of your skills to your resume for the benefit of the recruiter and yourself. This map contains a quick summary of the skills you have acquired over the years, making it easy for the recruiter to form an overall idea of what your skills are and what you have been focusing on in your previous endeavors.
On how to write a resume we use the following example of how a summary map of ones career competencies might look like:
What is the specific competency?YearsLevel of expertise
(1 = beginner 5 = expert)Other
The above example is a sample of how such a map could look like in your resume. how to write a resume that works for you will ultimately be shaped by your career direction and the choices you made in your life. Add more columns or remove some to fit the kind of summary of your skills you would like to present in your resume. Keep in mind the purpose of the skills table is to present the recruiter with a quick summary of where you have spent your time in growing your career competencies.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.
back to table of content
Summary map of your job experience
If you have had an extensive career history it is worth it to give a summary map of what you have done; starting with your most recent position. This map contains a quick summary of the different jobs you have had, for how long and what you did and learned. Make it easy for the recruiter to form an overall idea of what your career path were.
On how to write a resume we use the following example of how a summary map of ones career path might look like:
What was the job description?YearsExpertise gainedOther
The above example is just a sample of how such a map could look like in your resume. how to write a resume that works for you will ultimately be shaped by your career direction and the choices you made in your life. Add more columns or remove some to fit the kind of summary of the career path you have followed and want to present in your resume. Keep in mind the purpose of the summary table is to present the recruiter with a quick summary of where you have spent your time in growing which career competencies.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.
back to table of content
More specific job experience
Following the brief resume summaries is more detailed information on each specific job. Begin with your most recent job and work back from there. Here is the most important information recruiters expect in a complete resume:
Answer the following questions:
Give a quick summary of the specific position you held.
Where were you employed, with which company, country ext.?
For what period of time and which calendar year or years were you employed here?
What was expected of you, what was your job description?
Include major projects you were part of during your employment with this company.
This is very important! Do not just state what was expected, state what you achieved and be specific.
For example if you were supposed to drink two cups of coffee for the project and you completed three, say it. Give a summary of why you achieved this. Again focus on the choices you made and why. Tell the recruiter what you learned from this experience. Give all the information and at the same time only the information that is truly necessary.
At the end of this specific position what was your major achievements?
Give your reasons for wanting to leave your current position.
Stay away from “to be discussed”, it reflects badly on your relationship with your current employer; if you cannot discuss this what does it say? Be careful to leave space for interpretation by the recruiter. State the facts.
What was your remuneration on leaving?
Be open about this, stay away from “available on request”. Recruiters want this information to be there.
Ask the same questions for your second job, third job and etcetera.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.
back to table of content
Remuneration
If you have a specific expectation, state it as such. Make it clear that you are open for discussion on the subject if what you expect is not a cast in stone requirement.
Resume reference page
On your resume reference page give a list of your major achievements rather than a complete list of all the one day courses you have ever done. A comprehensive, tedious list detracts rather than adds to your resume. It might seem as if you consider going on the course more important than applying the knowledge. Include achievements that fit flow of your resume, give detail that add to the choices you have made in your career up to date. Refer to other less important courses where applicable in the body of your resume, say something like “I went on this course to learn more about a specific challenge I faced, I used this knowledge to achieve this.” When compiling the other how to write a resume sections you will find a place where you can fit course details like this.
Supply a reference for every job. If you say that a reference is available on request, it could mean you were not able to manage the relationship with that specific employer. Supply adequate contact details for every person on the list. If for whatever reason you do not feel comfortable including an individuals details; rather don’t include that reference in your resume reference page.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.
back to table of content
Get into the mind of the interviewer:
To write the best resume, is to understand how the interwiever thinks! We have used hundreds of books to help refine our interviewing skills over the years. The book we have gained the most from is Hiring the Best by Martin Yate:
Other career builder recources:
The 7 habits of highly successful people
Closing the feedback gap
Effective questioning skills
Productive listening skills
The Boston grids
Goal clirification
Taking ownership of ones career
Career Builder skills
How to make your own website
Working Resume
At Career Builder we apply the Working Resume process on an ongoing basis
(no pun intended :-). This process was forged in the fire of building real careers in our own companies as well as those of others. Freely apply these processes in your career. Many processes were developed to assist our Working Resume process. Some have been published; others are still in the process of being compiled for publishing. We share these remarkable career developing processes with you and hope to exchange value with you make them your own.
We will refine the processes more within the coming weeks and months. Apply the Working Resume process while building your resume; use the guidelines in our how to write a resume section.
The Working Resume process:
Frame the conversation
Using the Continuous Resume process within your current job might seem as if you are looking for another job. This might be true or not. In both instances remember to frame the conversation. Say something like, “You discovered this Continuous Resume process on the internet; what do they think of it and do they think it will be possible to implement this process in your company and team?.” Framing a conversation before you rush into detail will set the stage for high-quality information to flow.
Do a few self discovery exercises to get words describing you, these words will assist you when compiling your resume.Take the Tickle.com Free Personality Test to start building your library of descriptive words
Review and update your resume constantly
Your resume should grow and develop as you develop your career skills and competencies. Ones resume should not only become a priority once you start looking for a job. It is an amazing tool! One can use it to inform others of ones growth in competencies.
Use it to measure yourself and check if you are where you planned to be. In other words it could be a compelling event for you, updating your resume every three months and observing your personal growth or maybe one did not grow. Then what to do about the facts you gather from updating your resume. Using this information one is able to start planning future actions and next time a resume update is due, it will be a positive experience! Build the first version of this dynamic resume using the how to write a resume section.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free resume template and free sample resume page.
Confirm with those around you
Review and update your competencies by checking with colleagues, friends and family. This is a clever form of advertising yourself; without being obvious one makes it known how you have grown in skills and competencies. People know what to come to you for and feel more comfortable with the fact that you can get the job done, because they have seen your resume. Ask these people for advice and input on your resume and what you should add to it.
One also gains automatic input into future decisions based on the direction your resume makes clear your career seems to be taking. People love to give advice, seek this advice and inform them without them thinking you are being untoward. Always remember to say thank you to them. Even consider including them in your resume as a thank you for an insight gained from them; always ask their permission first. Build your resume into a format that can be easily updated using the input of other people; use our how to write a resume section tips and techniques.
Use your resume to inform those around you
Remember to frame the conversation before you ask for input. Not framing a conversation can have negative effects. Through asking and giving input one informs all those working with you. Identify the individuals you think would benefit from being better informed on matters concerning you and your skills. Ask their input on your resume. The effect of informing is of huge advantage to you, the process of asking for input is a natural and non-invasive method of informing. Use this method of asking input in everyday career building. People love to give their input. Use the resume writing tips we discuss in the how to write a resume section to build a working resume.
Use groups and forums to measure your progress
A very effective way to use the Continuous Resume process is within a group. Your team at work could use the Continuous Resume process to stay informed of the entire team member’s growth in skills and competencies. The group can challenge one another on different aspects which might require some more focus. All will be aware of one another’s progress over that period of time creating a compelling event for all to look forward to and develop ones resume toward that group meeting. If you need help writing your resume, go through our how to write a resume section. If you cannot find a resume writing solution there, please contact one of our experts.
Plan your future actions
From these group resume processes certain actions steps to take will develop; actions toward the development of your resume. Test with the group which future actions would best fit the direction your career is taking.

Welcome to the how to write a resume page, a step by step process for building your resume as well as free resume samples to get you started.

Career Builder has worked through in excess of four thousand resumes and cover letters over the past ten years. We have recruited more than five hundred people in our own companies as well as many other companies.

There are many ways one can use a resume to build a career, other than landing a job. Use our Working Resume process to inform those around you and shape your career. We share these processes with you; help us develop them further by telling us how you used them and what happened.

working resume

Write Your Working Resume

On Career Builder you will find tested ways to develop your career using your resume, as well as straightforward guidelines on what recruiters are looking for in a resume and what information a cover letter could contain. Before you start building your resume, you have to Get this free report!

The first section of this page consists of how to write a resume, the second part consists of a process we have developed and used in our own companies, the continuous Resume® process. Use our resume writing tips to build a working resume. If you need more examples visit our free sample resume page.

This page covers the following:

How to write a resume

How to write a resume the way the interviewer prefers it and resume writing tips

Working Resume

Use this process to inform others and build your career

The mind of the interviewer

Know what the interviewer will focus on before the interview and when writing your resume

How to write a resume

When writing a resume one wants a whole library of words describing the unique individual that is you. We recommend you do a few self discovery exercises to get information on how you do your best work and how to best describe yourself to the interviewer.

Remember the interviewer wants to get to know you and how you made choices in the past. Here are two such exercises to get you started:

Here is a chronological order on how to write a resume. Most recruiters expect a resume format similar to this:

  1. Personal details
  2. Resume cover letter
  3. Detail on your high school years
  4. Detail on your tertiary education
  5. Summary-map of your skills
  6. Summary-map of your job experience
  7. More specific job information
    • Starting with your most recent job
    • Second last
    • Third last
    • Etc.
  8. Remuneration
  9. Resume reference page
Resume writing is a great opportunity to talk about you. Go with your personal gut feeling on how to make your resume flow. Remember to keep the focus on you and the choices you made in your career, why you made those choices and what you learned from them. Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.

Personal details

Include the normal personal details in your resume. Include everything the recruiter might need to get in contact with you, for example a mobile number as well as a number for a land line.
In our how to write a resume section we do not include a list of all the specific personal details required. Go through our free sample resume page to get an idea of what is expected. Include all personal information that is necessary; be careful to include too much detail.
The resume is about you and your choices; be wary to do damage to your resume by placing too much focus on other information contained in your resume. As we said earlier, we do not include a detailed list in the how to write a resume section, visit our free resume templates and free sample resume page for examples on detailed personal details.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.

Resume cover letter

Most recruiters expect a resume cover letter at this position in the chronological order of your resume, not necessarily before the resume itself. A cover letter’s job is to briefly introduce your resume and then answer the following questions:
  • I apply for this job opening because…
  • I believe I can do this job because…
  • I want this job because…
You can have two approaches in writing your resume cover letter. The first cover letter approach is one focused on the company and the specific job opening. Shape your cover letter to fit the requirements of the job opening. We do not build on this strategy much in our how to write a resume information, recruiters prefer the second option…
The second approach is to write a general cover letter. This cover letter is focused on you and your achievements, your major choices in life and how they fit with the career opportunity presenting itself. Most recruiters prefer the second option. It is perceived as more natural and they get to know you as an individual.
In how to write a resume, we use the second option throughout our guidelines on resumes. Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.

Details on your high school years

In your resume one will include the normal high school detail. For example:
  • Where did you finish high school?
  • Which subjects did you have in your last year?
  • What were your symbols?
    • Include your symbols here as well, even though it is on your school certificate. It makes reading your resume easier for the recruiter.
  • Which sport did you do in school?
  • Which extracurricular activities did you participate in?
You have now given a summary of your last year of school. Now let’s drill into this information a bit, for the benefit of the recruiter reading your resume. Remember recruiters want to get to know you. The central theme of your resume should be the choices you made in your life. This is the biggest indication of who you are and how you will or won’t fit with the career opportunity presented. For this kind of drilling down information gathering ask yourself questions like:
  • Why did I select the subjects I did in school?
  • Which subjects did you enjoy and which subjects did you not enjoy?
  • Why did you enjoy the subjects you did?
  • Why did you not enjoy the other subjects?
  • Why did I choose to take part in sport?
  • Which sport did I enjoy and which not?
  • Why did I enjoy certain sports and other not?
  • Was I captaining my team?
  • If you were a leader of some kind, how did it come about and did you enjoy it or not and why?
Ask the same questions about your extracurricular activities. Note that the questions we have listed we use frequently in our how to write a resume process and resume coaching, if you wish to expand a bit on these questions feel free to do so. Let us know which questions worked for you.
If you need more help writing your resume contact one of our experts. Keep your resume focused on who you are and the choices you made, why you made them and what you learned from them.
Recruiters want to get to know you as an individual, understanding the choices you made can assist them in making a more informed decision. How to write a resume gives you the tools to build a resume that talks to recruiters.
Being thorough in your presentation of self puts you leagues ahead of the rest! Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume.
If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.

Detail on your tertiary education

Do a few self discovery exercises to get words describing you, these words will assist you when compiling your resume.
In your resume one will include the normal tertiary education detail. For example:
  • Which university did you go to?
  • Which subjects did you have?
  • What were your symbols?
    • Include your symbols here as well, even though it is on your degree. It makes reading your resume easier for the recruiter.
  • Which sport did you take part in?
  • What else did you do at university?
You have now given a summary of your tertiary education. Now let’s drill into this information a bit for the benefit of the recruiter reading your resume. Remember recruiters want to get to know you. The central theme of your resume should be the choices you made in your life; this is our focus on how to write a resume, telling the recruiter your story. Your choices are the biggest indication of who you are and how you will or won’t fit with the career opportunity presented. For this kind of drilling down information gathering ask yourself questions like:
  • Why did I choose the direction I did?
  • Which subjects did you enjoy and which subjects did you not enjoy?
  • Why did you enjoy the subjects you did?
  • Why did you not enjoy the other subjects?
  • Why did I choose to take part in sport?
  • Why did I enjoy certain sports and others not?
  • Was I captaining my team?
  • If you were a leader of some kind, how did it come about and did you enjoy it or not and why?
Ask the same questions concerning your other activities at university.
Keep your resume focused on who you are and the choices you made, why you made them and what you learned from them. Recruiters want to get to know you as an individual, understanding the choices you made can assist them in making a more informed choice. Being thorough in your presentation of self puts you leagues ahead of the rest!
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.

Summary map of your skills

Add the summary map of your skills to your resume for the benefit of the recruiter and yourself. This map contains a quick summary of the skills you have acquired over the years, making it easy for the recruiter to form an overall idea of what your skills are and what you have been focusing on in your previous endeavors.
On how to write a resume we use the following example of what a summary map of one’s career competencies might look like:
What is the specific competency? Years Level of expertis
(1 = beginner 5 = expert)
Other
How to write a resume that works for you will ultimately be shaped by your career direction and the choices you made in your life. Add more columns or remove some to fit the kind of summary of your skills you would like to present in your resume. Keep in mind the purpose of the skills table is to present the recruiter with a quick summary of where you have spent your time in growing your career competencies.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.

Summary map of your job experience

If you have had an extensive career history it is worth it to give a summary map of what you have done; starting with your most recent position. This map contains a quick summary of the different jobs you have had, the duration, what you did and what you learned. Make it easy for the recruiter to form an overall picture of your career path. On how to write a resume we use the following example of what a summary map of one’s career path might look like:
What was the job description? Years Expertise gained Other

How to write a resume that works for you will ultimately be shaped by your career direction and the choices you make in your life. Add more columns or remove some to fit the kind of summary of the career path you have followed and want to present in your resume. Keep in mind the purpose of the summary table is to present the recruiter with a quick summary of where you have spent your time in growing which career competencies.

Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.


More specific job experience

Following the brief resume summaries are more detailed information on each specific job. Begin with your most recent job and work back from there. Here is the most important information recruiters expect in a complete resume:
Answer the following questions:
  • Give a quick summary of the specific position you held.
  • Where were you employed, with which company, country etc.?
  • For what period of time and which calendar year or years were you employed here?
  • What was expected of you, what was your job description?
  • Include major projects you were part of during your employment with this company.
    • This is very important! Do not just state what was expected, state what you achieved and be specific.
    • For example if you were supposed to drink two cups of coffee for the project and you drank three, mention it. Give a summary of why you achieved this. Again focus on the choices you made and why. Tell the recruiter what you learned from this experience. Give all the necessary information relating to your skills and decision making.
    • List all your major achievements concerning this position.
  • Give your reasons for wanting to leave your current position.
  • Stay away from “to be discussed”, it reflects badly on your relationship with your current employer; if you cannot discuss this what does it say? Be careful to leave space for interpretation by the recruiter. State the facts.
  • What was your remuneration on leaving?
    • Be open about this, stay away from “available on request”. Recruiters want this information to be there.
  • Ask the same questions for your second job, third job and etc.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.

Remuneration

If you have a specific expectation, state it as such. Make it clear that you are open for discussion on the subject if what you expect is not a cast in stone.

Resume reference page

On your resume reference page give a list of your major achievements rather than a complete list of all the one day courses you have ever done. A comprehensive, tedious list detracts rather than adds to your resume. It might seem as if you consider going on the course more important than applying the knowledge.
Include achievements that fit the flow of your resume, relating to specific courses; give detail that add to the choices you have made in your career up to date. Refer to other less important courses where applicable in the body of your resume, say something like “I went on this course to learn more about a specific challenge I faced, I used this knowledge to achieve this”.
When compiling the other how to write a resume sections you will find a place where you can fit course details like this. Supply a reference for every job.
If you say that a reference is available on request, it could mean you were not able to manage the relationship with that specific employer. Supply adequate contact details for every person on the list. If for whatever reason you do not feel comfortable including an individuals details; rather don’t include that reference in your resume reference page.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.

Get into the mind of the interviewer

It is also important to understand what the interviewer wants! We have used hundreds of books to help refine our interviewing skills over the years. The book we have gained the most from is Hiring the Best by Martin Yate.

From Michael Page we have the top 10 interview questions:

  1. Tell me about yourself.
  2. What have your achievements been to date?
  3. Are you happy with your career-to-date?
  4. What is the most difficult situation you have had to face and how did you tackle it?
  5. What do you like about your present job?
  6. What do you dislike about your present job?
  7. What are your strengths?
  8. What is your greatest weakness?
  9. Why do you want to leave your current employer?
  10. Why have you applied for this particular job?

Other resources:

Working Resume

At Career Builder we apply the Working Resume process in an ongoing basis (no pun intended :-). This process was forged in the fire of building real careers in our own companies as well as those of others. Freely apply these processes in your career. Many processes were developed to assist with Working Resume. Some have been published; others are still in the process of being compiled for publishing. We share these remarkable career developing processes with you and hope to exchange value with you. Make them your own.
We will refine the processes more within the coming weeks and months. Apply the Working Resume process while building your resume; use the guidelines in our how to write a resume section.

The Working Resume process:

Frame the conversation

Using the Continuous Resume process within your current job might seem as if you are looking for another job. This might be true or not. In both cases remember to frame the conversation. Say something like, “I discovered this Continuous Resume process on the internet; what do you think of it and will it be possible to implement this process in the company and team?”. Framing a conversation before you rush into detail will set the stage for high-quality information to flow.

Review and update your resume constantly

Your resume should grow and develop as you develop your career skills and competencies. One’s resume should not only become a priority once you start looking for a job. It is an amazing tool! One can use it to inform others of one’s growth.
Use it to measure yourself and check if you are where you planned to be. It could be a compelling event for you, updating your resume every three months and observing your personal growth, or comfort zone. Then decide what to do about the facts you gathered from updating your resume. Using this information you are able to start planning future actions; the next time a resume update is due, it will be a positive experience! Build the first version of this dynamic resume using the how to write a resume section.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free resume template and free sample resume page.

Confirm with those around you

Review and update your skills by checking with colleagues, friends and family. This is a clever form of advertising yourself; without being obvious you make it known how you have grown. People know what to expect from you and feel more comfortable with the fact that you can get the job done, since they are part of your resume process. Ask these people for advice and input on your resume and what you should add to it.
You also gain automatic input in future decisions based on your decisions. Your resume makes clear which direction your career is taking. People love to give advice, seek this advice and inform them without being untoward. Always remember to thank them. Even consider including them in your resume as a thank you for an insight gained; always ask their permission first. Build your resume into a format that can be easily updated using the input of other people; use our how to write a resume section tips and techniques.

Use your resume to inform those around you

Remember to frame the conversation before you ask for input. Not framing a conversation can have negative effects. Through asking and giving input one informs all those working with you. Identify the individuals you think would benefit from being better informed on matters concerning you and your skills. Ask their input on your resume. The effect of informing is of huge advantage to you, the process of asking for input is a natural and non-invasive method of informing. Use this method of asking input in everyday career building. People love to give their input. Use the resume writing tips we discuss in the how to write a resume section to build a working resume.

Use groups and forums to measure your progress

A very effective way to use the Continuous Resume process is within a group. Your team at work could use the Continuous Resume process to stay informed of the entire team’s growth. The group can challenge one another on different aspects which might require some more focus. Everyone will be aware of one another’s progress over a period of time, creating a compelling event to look forward to.  Develop your resume toward that group meeting. If you need help writing your resume, go through our how to write a resume section. If you cannot find a resume writing solution there, please contact one of our experts.

Plan your future actions

From these group resume processes certain action steps will surface; actions toward the development of your resume. Test with the group which future actions would best fit the direction your career is taking.

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