Utilizing Common Ground

by Unre Visagie

Identify common ground and develop ones relationships
Chapter 5
p.6
Sometimes it is very difficult to find common ground with a customer or colleague. It feels as if we are talking right past each other.
How should I approach these situations?
Finding common ground with another person is essential in building a relationship between you and your clients, colleagues, family and friends.
The beliefs, assumptions or facts which create your opinions or points of view, constitute your “Rocks of Belief”.
You may however not be entirely comfortable with certain aspects of these beliefs, assumptions or facts. This will create areas of doubt – your “Grains of Disbelief”.
Belief has definite views or positions on a subject. If you wish to find common ground, you have to identify and focus on the “Grains of Disbelief “. You might even find that an overlap exists between your “Rocks of Belief” and the other person’s “Grains of Disbelief” on this particular subject. If you see yourself as the Believer in the picture, you will hold certain “Rocks of Belief” in your mind which determine your position on a certain subject or issue.
In your quest to find common ground with the Disbeliever who holds an opposing view, you must try and associate with the other’s “Grains of Belief”, in other words, those aspects of the issue with which the other person is not comfortable.
You might find that you share common ground on some of aspects of the issue. Conversely, the Disbeliever should associate with your “Grains of Disbelief” in order to find common ground with you. “Seeing yourself in the situation” will clarify the situation further.
How do you usually approach situations like these?

Identify common ground and develop one’s relationships

Chapter 5 p.6

w&t_question

I Ask

Sometimes it is very difficult to find common ground with a customer or colleague. It feels as if we are talking right past each other.

How should I approach these situations?

w&t_exclamation

I Answer

Finding common ground with another person is essential in building a relationship between you and your clients, colleagues, family and friends.

The beliefs, assumptions or facts which create your opinions or points of view, constitute your “Rocks of Belief”.

You may however not be entirely comfortable with certain aspects of these beliefs, assumptions or facts. This will create areas of doubt – your “Grains of Disbelief”.

w&t_ch5_i_utilizing_common_ground

w&t_binoculars

I Explain

Belief has definite views or positions on a subject. If you wish to find common ground, you have to identify and focus on the “Grains of Disbelief “. You might even find that an overlap exists between your “Rocks of Belief” and the other person’s “Grains of Disbelief”. If you see yourself as the Believer in the picture, you will hold certain “Rocks of Belief” in your mind which determine your position on a certain subject or issue.

In your quest to find common ground with the Disbeliever who holds an opposing view, you must try and associate with the other’s “Grains of Belief”, in other words, those aspects of the issue with which the other person is not comfortable.

You might find that you share common ground on some of aspects of the issue. Conversely, the Disbeliever should associate with your “Grains of Disbelief” in order to find common ground with you. “Seeing yourself in the situation” will clarify the situation further.

w&t_elephant

I Advise

How do you usually approach situations like these?

About Unre Visagie
I am a master coach with 30 years of career and business coaching experience. I have built and sold many of my own multi-million dollar companies. I have always built my companies based on the principle of successful people make a successful company. I invest in people. As your coach you get 30 years of experience to help you do the work you love and earn the salary you want.

{ 0 comments… add one now }

Leave a Comment

*
To prove you're a person (not a spam script), type the security word shown in the picture.
Anti-Spam Image

{ 1 trackback }

Previous post:

Next post: