Writing Your Resume

What to do before you start a job search
Following is a list of job search sites we found to be the best:
International job sites:
Yajoo! Hot jobs
Monster
CareerBuilder.com
South African job sites:
Career Junction.co.za
PNet.co.za
United Kingdom job sites:
Monster.co.uk
Jobbsite.co.uk
American job sites:
Monster.com
JobbankUSA.com
Asian job sites:
JobAsia.com
Before you consider starting a search, writing your resume or aiming for that promotion
You have to read this!
What every serious career builder must do before starting their job search!
A job search can turn your life upside down, or you can decide to turn it right side up! Remember to peel an orange. Read on…
Table of content:
1.Introduction
Why would one fail?
Why do only some succeed?
2. Why are you looking?
You might not have to!
3. Some presentations
A Work Triangle to use daily
4. Have a PLAN!
Questions and your answers build a puzzle
Mind like water
Peel an orange
Get the lay of the land
What do you need for the journey?
Pack your bag
Head on out into the blue!
Remember to PEEL AN ORANGE!
5. What next?
6. A Global community of support
7. Other resources
What every Career Builder must know before starting a job search, writing that resume or aiming for a promotion!
Get this free report now!
The free report contains the information on this page with added question and information for easy printing and taking with you to read at your leisure.
Your First name:
Your E-mail Address:
Introduction
Know what you want and it will be obvious to others, making your job search that much easier or getting that promotion you want!
If one does not have a plan when looking for that next career move, planning your job search, working to get that promotion or compiling ones resume; the manner in which one presents self is rarely the best it could be. Have a plan.
People with a plan succeed in what they set out to achieve. Ask yourself the question – Where do I see myself in five years, three years, in the next six months? Spend some time on this question, write your answers down and elaborate on them; we give a list of questions to get you started later on in the document. Write everything that comes to mind, if it means almost writing a small book on the things that triggers in ones mind, then GREAT! The more one has to work with in creating a plan, the better. You will also have the material with which to write your resume and starting your job search.
Photo credit: Jersha
One of the biggest causes of a failed job search, landing a less than perfect job or not getting that hard earned promotion is because ones direction is unclear. As in the story of Alice in wonderland:
Alice : “Which road should I take?”
Rabbit: “Well, where are you going?”
Alice : “I don’t know.”
Rabbit: “Well, then I suppose any old road will do.”
I might have my characters a bit mixed up, but the concept remains simple. Know which road, mountain pass or turn-off to take when presented with the choice; or else “Any old road will do” and 99% of the time that road will take you to “Any old place.”
Remember to peel an orange every now and again.
Why are you looking?
Some of the reasons you will find yourself in a job search position is either
You have learned all you could in your current job and want to move on, starting to plan your job search already.
You feel you have earned that career promotion and are looking for the best way to get it.
You have finished your studies and are looking for the best first career move, your first and very crucial job search.
Whichever one it is, before the job search breathes its first breath, formulate your plan.
You might not have to be looking
If you are already working with a company you might not have to be busy planning your job search, read on…
Complete the whole process of putting together your plan. Read this page from beginning to end and follow the guidelines on it. At the appropriate time, complete your resume; it will become clear when this is.
Make a list of all the companies you would like to go and work with. Do a bit of research on each of these companies, if it is convenient, talk to someone currently employed by these companies. Write down why you would like to work with these companies and what you don’t like – the pros and cons. Why do you think these companies will be able to provide you with a better environment to achieve your career goals?
This whole process of gathering info should not take you longer than a few days – one does not want to spend too much time on this.
Why all this trouble?
We found that taking incremental steps toward achieving your career objectives is often times the best way to go about growing your career. And the company you are currently working with might be a goldfield in disguise!
For more detailed information on “You might not have to be planning that job search after all ” get the free report:
Your First name:
Your E-mail Address:
Some presentations
Have a look at the following presentation, it was created for a local project we are part of, but should trigger some thoughts.
Work triangle presentation for a specific project.
Here is a simple graphic explaining the process in short.
Have a PLAN
Before taking a job search head-on, every Career Builder should have a plan of action. Every individual intuitively knows what they want; we all have a unique in-built map. The most challenging thing is to make sense of that map and to know how to get where you want to be!
Here at Aleph we have accumulated substantial knowledge on how to build careers and businesses; it is packaged into our Walk & Talk guide and a version of this guide is freely available on Careersdevelopmentplan.net. Every person has unique belief systems, needs and perspectives and will always take on a job search in a wonderfully unique manner. The one universal truth – if you don’t now where you are going, any old road will do… We have worked with many individuals and assisted them in putting together a plan; we have worked with the experts who understand these processes and packaged their knowledge into our Walk & Talk guide for careers. We spent the last years fusing all the theoretical knowledge into a whole. Careerdevelopmentplan.net is dedicated to sharing this knowledge with the world one individual at a time; we are working to create a community where people will freely share their career experiences and build one another!
If you want to know more about this community, please click here.
PLAN – before the job search
Clear your mind , one needs to get all the information on the table concerned with where you see your career heading. The best way to do this is to ask another person to assist you, preferably a trusted, more experienced and older individual to ask you the list of questions listed below as well as their own questions. It is always best to talk ones mind to another individual, if they just listen and ask questions, you are able to hear yourself and structure your thoughts. Talking to another person will clarify your plan and make your job search or next career move clear and implement-able.
Here’s a list of some of the questions we use in our coaching sessions:
Where do you see yourself in five years?
Do you feel sufficiently challenged by your current career position?
If no, what is missing?
If yes, how could you make better use of your opportunities?
Are you currently where you want to be in your career?
If no, where would you rather be?
If yes, what are the reasons for planning a next career move?
Are you happy with your current salary?
If no, what do you think you are worth and why, what can you change to get paid what you are worth?
If yes, do you think you could grow your life income and how?
For more questions get the free report on “Getting ready for your job search” delivered to your inbox!
Your First name:
Your E-mail Address:
If you want one of our coaches to take you through this process please complete this form and we will contact you for a one-on-one coaching session.
There are other questions later in this report concerned with more detailed actions to take toward planning your job search or getting that promotion. The purpose of the above list is to give one a big picture view of where you are currently, where you are headed and where you would want to be ideally.
With all the above said and done its time to sit back and spend some quality thinking and writing time. Go and make yourself a warm cup of something nice and slowly read through all the answers you wrote down. If more thoughts and information trigger in your mind, write them down as well.
This initial process of clearing ones mind is very important. One should have a mind like a pond when formulating the plan on which you will base your next best career move; then start your job search. You are able to formulate a big picture and peacefully, skillfully integrate the detail and fit the pieces of this exciting puzzle of growth into the whole!
“…the “mind like water” concept… When you throw a pebble into a pond, what does the water do? It responds with total appropriateness to the force and mass of the rock. It does nothing more and nothing less. It doesn’t overreact or under-react. It doesn’t react at all. It simply interacts with whatever comes to it and then returns to its natural state.” – David Allen, Getting Things Done
In our team we like to remind one another to stop climbing the mountain of life, sit down, look back and peel an orange; else you might get way too tired, fall over a cliff and have to walk all the way back up again! We all have a very unique road we walk and sometimes the mountain in front of us seems to be very, very big indeed. We just keep on walking, climbing, anything to get over this mountain and onto the next one!
Climbing these mountains means learning and growing, this is sometimes hard, but we rarely stop and take note of the wonderful things we learn from climbing. We don’t sit back and peel an orange. Regularly take a breather, choose an orange from your rucksack, sit back, look back, relax and enjoy the view; life is a journey, not a race.
Once you have answered the list of questions above, you have peeled your orange and are ready to have a look at the panorama in front of you; you have surveyed your map in earnest and have a good idea of how to go about your job search or promotion plan. Now, the only question remaining is where do you want to be on that map?
From answering the questions or sitting back and peeling an orange, one should have a very good idea of the lay of the land. Where are the valleys and the peaks? Which route would be the best one to take to get to my destination? Remember the easiest route is very rarely the best route. Determine which road has the most supplies on the way to your next stop. Which road is the most scenic and the most fun to take? Life is a journey, not a destination.
Now we need to determine what one should pack for this journey. What am I going to need to go about my job search or promotion plan the best?
What does one need for the journey?
For example, there is a very high cliff between me and my first stop; I will need a rope and some climbing gear. In life it is not much different. Let’s say you want to get a promotion or plan a job search. Here is a list of detail questions to get you going:
Which skills does an individual in that specific position need?
What am I going to do to get those skills?
Who do I have to get to know to be able to understand what would be required from me to get the promotion or the job?
Get some more questions in the free report!
Your First name:
Your E-mail Address:
This is a get you going in the right direction list of questions. If you want one of our coaches to take you through this process in detail please complete this form and we will contact you for a one-on-one coaching session.
These are guiding questions in determining what equipment one needs to get to the next stop. Remember to walk and plan one day at a time. Have a big picture in mind, not a big plan implemented in one day idea. Baby steps will get one there!
Photo credit: Chrissi Nerantzi
Pack your bag
Which equipment comes first, what will I need first and what will I need later? By now one has a very good idea of where you are headed and what will be required to get there. Now all that remains is to determine which one of these things/skills, identified as necessary to reach my first stop, will I need first and what do I need to do to get it packed into my bag? What is the action steps necessary toward achieving this first task, then objective, then goal and then packed in my backpack ready to go!
Maybe one needs to go to a communication workshop to sharpen specific skills. Delegation should also be very well understood by all Career Builders. What about listening skills, questioning skills? Are these skills up to scratch? For a complete list of the skills forming part of a Career Builders’ foundation, feel free to use our Walk & Talk guide.
Head out into the blue!
Your bag is packed and you are ready to head out toward that first stop. It is sometimes so easy to get stuck in one place. Don’t get caught by the fear of moving out into the unknown! If your backpack is packed as well as you can possibly pack it with what you think is necessary, then head out, don’t tinker with more supplies and better knowledge. The lighter you are packed, the more fun it will be to get to the next stop. You won’t get as tired either and will appreciate the awesome view even more! There will be many resources and opportunities on the way to stock up and go again. If one recognizes an opportunity along the way and know it will add to your journey, take it!
Just don’t get sidetracked from from your ultimate destination, but stay flexible, have fun, know what you want to achieve today and fit the surprises into your plan. It’s always more fun when one stops and has that chat with fellow travelers.
And remember to PEEL AN ORANGE!
What next?
Once your plan is first round completed, you know where you want to go and you have the action steps to get there, start building your resume. A resume should be an ongoing part of a Career Builders life. One uses it as a measurement, update your resume every three months and see how you have grown and mastered new knowledge! It is a peel an orange moment and builds confidence. Even if you are not planning a job search, keep your resume up to date.
A great way to get words for describing yourself is doing a few self discovery exercises on the web. The results from these questionnaires contain words that you can use in your resume to describe yourself. We give a short summary of this at the top of our resume page as well. In future publications, we will give more in-depth information on the process of determining what kind of work environment suits your unique person the best. Here are links to two such questionnaires:
Tickle.com
MAPP assessments
Recruiters are more and more using the web to verify an individual’s credibility. If they type your name into the Google search engine, yours should be in the top ten, preferably the very first on the list. Here are three individuals we are working with and created their web presence for them:
Nicholas Grobler
Unre Visagie
Dawie Roux
Type these names into Google and they are in the top ten. Getting your name on the web is becoming of higher and higher import before starting a job search. It builds credibility and the articles you publish on your web site concerned with your field of expertise, makes it obvious to a recruiter that you know what you are talking about. Have a look at our page on how to build a personal site.
If you have not come to realize that you can achieve your short term goals at your company, then now is the time to implement that job search. When one has a plan, identifying the next company you would enjoy working with almost becomes dropping of your resume at their door. Since you would have spoken to experts with access, you have identified the gaps you have and are working with experts to close these gaps. You have communicated your plan and cannot be ignored. Use our resume process to get you started on building a working resume.
Remember to refer back to our free version of the Walk & Talk guide for career building resources! Our guide will also be of huge value in implementing your job search.
If at any time you feel stuck, our coaches are available to “unstuck” you. Please complete this form and we will contact you for a one-on-one coaching session.
Global community of support
We are in the process of establishing the needs of fellow Career Builders across the globe and want to launch a forum. We envision this forum to be a place where Career Builders come to get input from others on career challenges they are facing. It would be fantastic if we could get your input on what such a forum should contain. Please send us your input.
Other resources
These resources can assist you in formulating your plan, planning your job search and building your resume.
Careerbuilder.com
Monster.com
Alec.co.uk
We have included links to more web sites in the free report that can assist one in getting ready for a job search, writing your resume as well as the job search itself.
Your First name:
Your E-mail Address:

What to do before you start a job search

Following is a list of job search sites we found to be the best

International job sites

Yahoo! Hot jobs

Monster

CareerBuilder.com

South African job sites

Career Junction.co.za

PNet.co.za

United Kingdom job sites

Monster.co.uk

Jobsite.co.uk

American job sites

Monster

JobbankUSA.com

What every serious career builder must do before starting their job search!

Introduction

Know what you want and it will be obvious to others, making your job search that much easier or getting that promotion you want!

If one does not have a plan when looking for that next career move, planning your job search, working to get that promotion or compiling ones resume; the manner in which one presents self is rarely the best it could be. Have a plan.

People with a plan succeed in what they set out to achieve. Ask yourself the question – Where do I see myself in five years, three years, in the next six months? Spend some time on this question, write your answers down and elaborate on them; we give a list of questions to get you started later on in the document. Write everything that comes to mind, if it means almost writing a small book on the things that triggers in ones mind, then GREAT! The more one has to work with in creating a plan, the better. You will also have the material with which to write your resume and starting your job search.

article-job-search-photo-waterfall

Photo credit: Jersha

w&t_elephant

I Advise

One of the biggest causes of a failed job search, landing a less than perfect job or not getting that hard earned promotion is because one’s direction is unclear. As in the story of Alice in wonderland:

Alice : “Which road should I take?”

Rabbit: “Well, where are you going?”

Alice : “I don’t know.”

Rabbit: “Well, then I suppose any old road will do.”

I might have my characters a bit mixed up, but the concept remains simple. Know which road, mountain pass or turn-off to take when presented with the choice; or else “Any old road will do” and 99% of the time that road will take you to “Any old place.”

Why are you looking?

Some of the reasons you will find yourself in a job search position is either

  • You have learned all you could in your current job and want to move on, starting to plan your job search already.
  • You feel you have earned that career promotion and are looking for the best way to get it.
  • You have finished your studies and are looking for the best first career move, your first and very crucial job search.

Whichever one it is, before the job search breathes its first breath, formulate your plan.

You might not have to be looking

If you are already working with a company you might not have to be busy planning your job search, read on…

Complete the whole process of putting together your plan. Read this page from beginning to end and follow the guidelines on it. At the appropriate time, complete your resume; it will become clear when this is.

Make a list of all the companies you would like to go and work with. Do a bit of research on each of these companies, if it is convenient, talk to someone currently employed by these companies. Write down why you would like to work with these companies and what you don’t like – the pros and cons. Why do you think these companies will be able to provide you with a better environment to achieve your career goals?

This whole process of gathering info should not take you longer than a few days – one does not want to spend too much time on this.

Why all this trouble?

We found that taking incremental steps toward achieving your career objectives is often times the best way to go about growing your career. And the company you are currently working with might be a goldfield in disguise!

Have a PLAN

w&t_binoculars

I Explain

Before taking a job search head-on, every Career Builder should have a plan of action. Every individual intuitively knows what they want; we all have a unique in-built map. The most challenging thing is to make sense of that map and to know how to get where you want to be!

Here at Aleph we have accumulated substantial knowledge on how to build careers and businesses; it is packaged into our Walk & Talk guide and a version of this guide is freely available on Careersdevelopmentplan.net. Every person has unique belief systems, needs and perspectives and will always take on a job search in a wonderfully unique manner. The one universal truth – if you don’t now where you are going, any old road will do… We have worked with many individuals and assisted them in putting together a plan; we have worked with the experts who understand these processes and packaged their knowledge into our Walk & Talk guide for careers. We spent the last years fusing all the theoretical knowledge into a whole. Careerdevelopmentplan.net is dedicated to sharing this knowledge with the world one individual at a time; we are working to create a community where people will freely share their career experiences and build one another!

If you want to know more about this community, please click here.

PLAN – before the job search

Clear your mind , one needs to get all the information on the table concerned with where you see your career heading. The best way to do this is to ask another person to assist you, preferably a trusted, more experienced and older individual to ask you the list of questions listed below as well as their own questions. It is always best to talk ones mind to another individual, if they just listen and ask questions, you are able to hear yourself and structure your thoughts. Talking to another person will clarify your plan and make your job search or next career move clear and implement-able.

w&t_exclamation

I Answer

Here’s a list of some of the questions we use in our coaching sessions:

  • Where do you see yourself in five years?
  • Do you feel sufficiently challenged by your current career position?
    • If no, what is missing?
    • If yes, how could you make better use of your opportunities?
  • Are you currently where you want to be in your career?
    • If no, where would you rather be?
    • If yes, what are the reasons for planning a next career move?
  • Are you happy with your current salary?
    • If no, what do you think you are worth and why, what can you change to get paid what you are worth?
    • If yes, do you think you could grow your life income and how?

If you want one of our coaches to take you through this process please complete this form and we will contact you for a one-on-one coaching session.

article-job-search-photo-steaming

There are other questions later in this report concerned with more detailed actions to take toward planning your job search or getting that promotion. The purpose of the above list is to give one a big picture view of where you are currently, where you are headed and where you would want to be ideally.

w&t_elephant

I Advise

With all the above said and done its time to sit back and spend some quality thinking and writing time. Go and make yourself a warm cup of something nice and slowly read through all the answers you wrote down. If more thoughts and information trigger in your mind, write them down as well.

This initial process of clearing ones mind is very important. One should have a mind like a pond when formulating the plan on which you will base your next best career move; then start your job search. You are able to formulate a big picture and peacefully, skillfully integrate the detail and fit the pieces of this exciting puzzle of growth into the whole!

…the “mind like water” concept… When you throw a pebble into a pond, what does the water do? It responds with total appropriateness to the force and mass of the rock. It does nothing more and nothing less. It doesn’t overreact or under-react. It doesn’t react at all. It simply interacts with whatever comes to it and then returns to its natural state.

– David Allen, Getting Things Done

In our team we like to remind one another to stop climbing the mountain of life, sit down, look back and peel an orange; else you might get way too tired, fall over a cliff and have to walk all the way back up again! We all have a very unique road we walk and sometimes the mountain in front of us seems to be very, very big indeed. We just keep on walking, climbing, anything to get over this mountain and onto the next one!

article-job-search-photo-orange2

Climbing these mountains means learning and growing, this is sometimes hard, but we rarely stop and take note of the wonderful things we learn from climbing. We don’t sit back and peel an orange. Regularly take a breather, choose an orange from your rucksack, sit back, look back, relax and enjoy the view; life is a journey, not a race.

w&t_binoculars

I Explain

Once you have answered the list of questions above, you have peeled your orange and are ready to have a look at the panorama in front of you; you have surveyed your map in earnest and have a good idea of how to go about your job search or promotion plan. Now, the only question remaining is where do you want to be on that map?

From answering the questions or sitting back and peeling an orange, one should have a very good idea of the lay of the land. Where are the valleys and the peaks? Which route would be the best one to take to get to my destination? Remember the easiest route is very rarely the best route. Determine which road has the most supplies on the way to your next stop. Which road is the most scenic and the most fun to take? Life is a journey, not a destination.

landscape

Photo credit: Chad

Now we need to determine what one should pack for this journey. What am I going to need to go about my job search or promotion plan the best?

What does one need for the journey?

For example, there is a very high cliff between me and my first stop; I will need a rope and some climbing gear. In life it is not much different. Let’s say you want to get a promotion or plan a job search. Here is a list of detail questions to get you going:

  • Which skills does an individual in that specific position need?
  • What am I going to do to get those skills?
  • Who do I have to get to know to be able to understand what would be required from me to get the promotion or the job?

This is a get you going in the right direction list of questions. If you want one of our coaches to take you through this process in detail please complete this form and we will contact you for a one-on-one coaching session.

w&t_elephant

I Advise

These are guiding questions in determining what equipment one needs to get to the next stop. Remember to walk and plan one day at a time. Have the big picture in mind, not a big plan implemented in one day idea. Baby steps will get one there!

Pack your bag

Which equipment comes first, what will I need first and what will I need later? By now one has a very good idea of where you are headed and what will be required to get there. Now all that remains is to determine which one of these things/skills, identified as necessary to reach my first stop, will I need first and what do I need to do to get it packed into my bag? What is the action steps necessary toward achieving this first task, then objective, then goal and then packed in my backpack ready to go!

Maybe one needs to go to a communication workshop to sharpen specific skills. Delegation should also be very well understood by all Career Builders. What about listening skills, questioning skills? Are these skills up to scratch? For a complete list of the skills forming part of a Career Builders’ foundation, feel free to use our Walk & Talk guide.

article-job-search-photo-mountian

Head out into the blue!

Your bag is packed and you are ready to head out toward that first stop. It is sometimes so easy to get stuck in one place. Don’t get caught by the fear of moving out into the unknown! If your backpack is packed as well as you possibly can pack it with what you think is necessary, then head out, don’t tinker with more supplies and better knowledge. The lighter you are packed, the more fun it will be to get to the next stop. You won’t get as tired either and will appreciate the awesome view even more! There will be many resources and opportunities on the way to stock up and go again. If one recognizes an opportunity along the way and know it will add to your journey, take it!

w&t_elephant

I Advise

Just don’t get sidetracked from from your ultimate destination, but stay flexible, have fun, know what you want to achieve today and fit the surprises into your plan. It’s always more fun when one stops and has that chat with fellow travelers.

And remember to PEEL AN ORANGE!

What next?

Once your plan is first round completed, you know where you want to go and you have the action steps to get there, start building your resume. A resume should be an ongoing part of a Career Builders life. One uses it as a measurement, update your resume every three months and see how you have grown and mastered new knowledge! It is a peel an orange moment and builds confidence. Even if you are not planning a job search, keep your resume up to date.

A great way to get words for describing yourself is doing a few self discovery exercises on the web. The results from these questionnaires contain words that you can use in your resume to describe yourself. In future publications, we will give more in-depth information on the process of determining what kind of work environment suits your unique person the best. Here is such a link:

MAPP assessments

Recruiters are increasingly using the web to verify an individual’s credibility. If they type your name into the Google search engine, yours should be in the top ten, preferably the very first on the list. Here are three individuals we are working with and created their web presence for them:

Nicholas Grobler

Unre Visagie

Dawie Roux

Type these names into Google and they are in the top ten. Getting your name on the web is becoming of higher and higher importance before starting a job search. It builds credibility and the articles you publish on your web site concerned with your field of expertise, makes it obvious to a recruiter that you know what you are talking about. Have a look at our page on how to build a personal site.

article-job-search-photo-baby

Photo credit: Chrissi Nerantzi

If you have not come to realize that you can achieve your short term goals at your company, then now is the time to implement that job search. When one has a plan, identifying the next company you would enjoy working with almost becomes dropping of your resume at their door. Since you would have spoken to experts with access, you have identified the gaps you have and are working with experts to close these gaps. You have communicated your plan and cannot be ignored. Use our resume process to get you started on building a working resume.

Remember to refer back to our free version of the Walk & Talk guide for career building resources! Our guide will also be of huge value in implementing your job search.

If at any time you feel stuck, our coaches are available to “unstuck” you. Please complete this form and we will contact you for a one-on-one coaching session.

Global community of support

We are in the process of establishing the needs of fellow Career Builders across the globe and want to launch a forum. We envision this forum to be a place where Career Builders come to get input from others on career challenges they are facing. It would be fantastic if we could get your input on what such a forum should contain. Please send us your input.

How to write a resume
How to write a resume and the Continuous Resumes® process
Welcome to the how to write a resume page, a step by step process for building your resume as well as free resume samples to get you started.
Career Builder has worked through in excess of four thousand resumes and cover letters over the past ten years. We have recruited more than five hundred people in our own companies as well as many other companies. There are many ways one can use a resume to build a career, other than landing a job.
Use our Working Resume process to inform those around you and shape your career. We share these processes with you; help us develop them further by telling us how you used them and what happened. On Career Builder you will find tested ways to develop your career using your resume, as well as straightforward guidelines on what recruiters are looking for in a resume and what information a cover letter could contain.
Before you start building your resume, you have to
Get this free report!
The first section of this page consists of how to write a resume, the second part consists of a process we have developed and use in our own companies, the Working Resume process. Use our resume writing tips to build a working resume. If you need more examples visit our free sample resume page.
Where would you like to go:
How to write a resume
How to write a resume the way the interviewer prefers it and resume writing tips
Working Resume
Use this process to inform others and build your career
The mind of the interviewer
Know what the interviewer will focus on before the interview and when writing your resume
How to write a resume
When writing a resume one wants a whole library of words describing the unique individual that is you. We recommend you do a few self discovery exercises to get information on how you do your best work and how to best describe yourself to the interviewer. Remember the interviewer wants to get to know you and how you made choices in the past. Here are two such exercises to get you started:
Tickle.com Free Personality Test
Take the FREE MAPP Assessment
Here is a chronological order on how to write a resume. Most recruiters expect a resume format similar to this:
Personal details
Resume cover letter
Detail on your high school years
Detail on your tertiary education
Summary-map of your skills
Summary-map of your job experience
More specific job information
Starting with your most recent job
Second last
Third last
Etcetera.
Remuneration
Resume reference page
Resume writing is a great opportunity to talk about you. Go with your personal gut feeling on how to make your resume flow. Remember to keep the focus on you and the choices you made in your career, why you made those choices and what you learned from them. Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.
Personal details
Include the normal personal details in your resume. Include everything the recruiter might need to get in contact with you, for example a mobile number as well as a number for a land line. In our how to write a resume section we do not include a list of all the specific personal details required. Go through our free sample resume page to get an idea of what is expected.
Include all personal information that is necessary; be careful to include too much detail. The resume is about you and your choices; be wary to do damage to your resume by placing too much focus on other information contained in your resume. As we said earlier, we do not include a detailed list in the how to write a resume section, visit our free resume templates and free sample resume page for examples on detailed personal details.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.
back to table of content
Resume cover letter
Most recruiters expect a resume cover letter at this position in the chronological order of your resume, not necessarily before the resume itself. A cover letter’s job is to briefly introduce your resume and then answer the following questions:
I apply for this job opening because…
I believe I can do this job because…
I want this job because…
You can have two approaches in writing your resume cover letter. The first cover letter approach is one focused on the company and the specific job opening. Shape your cover letter to fit the requirements of the job opening. We do not build on this strategy much in our how to write a resume information, recruiters prefer the second option…
The second approach is to write a general cover letter. This cover letter is focused on you and your achievements, your major choices in life and how they fit with the career opportunity presenting itself.
Most recruiters prefer the second option. It is perceived as more natural and they get to know you as an individual. In how to write a resume, we use the second option throughout our guidelines on resumes.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.
back to table of content
Detail on your high school years
In your resume one will include the normal high school detail. For example:
Where did you finish high school?
Which subjects did you have in your last year?
What were your symbols?
Include your symbols here as well, even though it is on your school certificate. It makes reading your resume easier for the recruiter.
Which sport did you do in school?
Which extracurricular activities did you participate in?
You have now given a summary of your last year of school. Now let’s drill into this information a bit, for the benefit of the recruiter reading your resume. Remember recruiters want to get to know you. The central theme of your resume should be the choices you made in your life. This is the biggest indication of who you are and how you will or won’t fit with the career opportunity presented. For this kind of drilling down information gathering ask yourself questions like:
Why did I select the subjects I did in school?
Which subjects did you enjoy and which subjects did you not enjoy?
Why did you enjoy the subjects you did?
Why did you not enjoy the other subjects?
Why did I choose to take part in sport?
Which sport did I enjoy and which not?
Why did I enjoy certain sports and other not?
Was I captaining my team?
If you were a leader of some kind, how did it come about and did you enjoy it or not and why?
Ask the same questions about your extracurricular activities. Note that the questions we have listed we use frequently in our how to write a resume process and resume coaching , if you wish to expand a bit on these questions feel free to do so. Let us know which questions worked for you, if you need more help writing your resume contact one of our experts.
Keep your resume focused on who you are and the choices you made, why you made them and what you learned from them. Recruiters want to get to know you as an individual, understanding the choices you made can assist them in making a more informed decision. how to write a resume gives you the tools to build a resume that talks to the recruiters. Being thorough in your presentation of self puts you leagues ahead of the rest!
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.
back to table of content
Detail on your tertiary education
Do a few self discovery exercises to get words describing you, these words will assist you when compiling your resume.Take the Tickle.com Free Personality Test to start building your library of descriptive words
In your resume one will include the normal tertiary education detail. For example:
Which university did you go to?
Which subjects did you have?
What were your symbols?
Include your symbols here as well, even though it is on your degree. It makes reading your resume easier for the recruiter.
Which sport did you take part in?
What else did you do at university?
You have now given a summary of your tertiary education. Now let’s drill into this information a bit for the benefit of the recruiter reading your resume. Remember recruiters want to get to know you. The central theme of your resume should be the choices you made in your life; this is our focus on how to write a resume, telling the recruiter your story. Your choices are the biggest indication of who you are and how you will or won’t fit with the career opportunity presented. For this kind of drilling down information gathering ask yourself questions like:
Why did I choose the direction I did?
Which subjects did you enjoy and which subjects did you not enjoy?
Why did you enjoy the subjects you did?
Why did you not enjoy the other subjects?
Why did I choose to take part in sport?
Why did I enjoy certain sports and others not?
Was I captaining my team?
If you were a leader of some kind, how did it come about and did you enjoy it or not and why?
Ask the same questions concerning your other activities at university.
Keep your resume focused on who you are and the choices you made, why you made them and what you learned from them. Recruiters want to get to know you as an individual, understanding the choices you made can assist them in making a more informed choice. Being thorough in your presentation of self puts you leagues ahead of the rest!
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.
back to table of content
Summary map of your skills
Add the summary map of your skills to your resume for the benefit of the recruiter and yourself. This map contains a quick summary of the skills you have acquired over the years, making it easy for the recruiter to form an overall idea of what your skills are and what you have been focusing on in your previous endeavors.
On how to write a resume we use the following example of how a summary map of ones career competencies might look like:
What is the specific competency?YearsLevel of expertise
(1 = beginner 5 = expert)Other
The above example is a sample of how such a map could look like in your resume. how to write a resume that works for you will ultimately be shaped by your career direction and the choices you made in your life. Add more columns or remove some to fit the kind of summary of your skills you would like to present in your resume. Keep in mind the purpose of the skills table is to present the recruiter with a quick summary of where you have spent your time in growing your career competencies.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.
back to table of content
Summary map of your job experience
If you have had an extensive career history it is worth it to give a summary map of what you have done; starting with your most recent position. This map contains a quick summary of the different jobs you have had, for how long and what you did and learned. Make it easy for the recruiter to form an overall idea of what your career path were.
On how to write a resume we use the following example of how a summary map of ones career path might look like:
What was the job description?YearsExpertise gainedOther
The above example is just a sample of how such a map could look like in your resume. how to write a resume that works for you will ultimately be shaped by your career direction and the choices you made in your life. Add more columns or remove some to fit the kind of summary of the career path you have followed and want to present in your resume. Keep in mind the purpose of the summary table is to present the recruiter with a quick summary of where you have spent your time in growing which career competencies.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.
back to table of content
More specific job experience
Following the brief resume summaries is more detailed information on each specific job. Begin with your most recent job and work back from there. Here is the most important information recruiters expect in a complete resume:
Answer the following questions:
Give a quick summary of the specific position you held.
Where were you employed, with which company, country ext.?
For what period of time and which calendar year or years were you employed here?
What was expected of you, what was your job description?
Include major projects you were part of during your employment with this company.
This is very important! Do not just state what was expected, state what you achieved and be specific.
For example if you were supposed to drink two cups of coffee for the project and you completed three, say it. Give a summary of why you achieved this. Again focus on the choices you made and why. Tell the recruiter what you learned from this experience. Give all the information and at the same time only the information that is truly necessary.
At the end of this specific position what was your major achievements?
Give your reasons for wanting to leave your current position.
Stay away from “to be discussed”, it reflects badly on your relationship with your current employer; if you cannot discuss this what does it say? Be careful to leave space for interpretation by the recruiter. State the facts.
What was your remuneration on leaving?
Be open about this, stay away from “available on request”. Recruiters want this information to be there.
Ask the same questions for your second job, third job and etcetera.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.
back to table of content
Remuneration
If you have a specific expectation, state it as such. Make it clear that you are open for discussion on the subject if what you expect is not a cast in stone requirement.
Resume reference page
On your resume reference page give a list of your major achievements rather than a complete list of all the one day courses you have ever done. A comprehensive, tedious list detracts rather than adds to your resume. It might seem as if you consider going on the course more important than applying the knowledge. Include achievements that fit flow of your resume, give detail that add to the choices you have made in your career up to date. Refer to other less important courses where applicable in the body of your resume, say something like “I went on this course to learn more about a specific challenge I faced, I used this knowledge to achieve this.” When compiling the other how to write a resume sections you will find a place where you can fit course details like this.
Supply a reference for every job. If you say that a reference is available on request, it could mean you were not able to manage the relationship with that specific employer. Supply adequate contact details for every person on the list. If for whatever reason you do not feel comfortable including an individuals details; rather don’t include that reference in your resume reference page.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.
back to table of content
Get into the mind of the interviewer:
To write the best resume, is to understand how the interwiever thinks! We have used hundreds of books to help refine our interviewing skills over the years. The book we have gained the most from is Hiring the Best by Martin Yate:
Other career builder recources:
The 7 habits of highly successful people
Closing the feedback gap
Effective questioning skills
Productive listening skills
The Boston grids
Goal clirification
Taking ownership of ones career
Career Builder skills
How to make your own website
Working Resume
At Career Builder we apply the Working Resume process on an ongoing basis
(no pun intended :-). This process was forged in the fire of building real careers in our own companies as well as those of others. Freely apply these processes in your career. Many processes were developed to assist our Working Resume process. Some have been published; others are still in the process of being compiled for publishing. We share these remarkable career developing processes with you and hope to exchange value with you make them your own.
We will refine the processes more within the coming weeks and months. Apply the Working Resume process while building your resume; use the guidelines in our how to write a resume section.
The Working Resume process:
Frame the conversation
Using the Continuous Resume process within your current job might seem as if you are looking for another job. This might be true or not. In both instances remember to frame the conversation. Say something like, “You discovered this Continuous Resume process on the internet; what do they think of it and do they think it will be possible to implement this process in your company and team?.” Framing a conversation before you rush into detail will set the stage for high-quality information to flow.
Do a few self discovery exercises to get words describing you, these words will assist you when compiling your resume.Take the Tickle.com Free Personality Test to start building your library of descriptive words
Review and update your resume constantly
Your resume should grow and develop as you develop your career skills and competencies. Ones resume should not only become a priority once you start looking for a job. It is an amazing tool! One can use it to inform others of ones growth in competencies.
Use it to measure yourself and check if you are where you planned to be. In other words it could be a compelling event for you, updating your resume every three months and observing your personal growth or maybe one did not grow. Then what to do about the facts you gather from updating your resume. Using this information one is able to start planning future actions and next time a resume update is due, it will be a positive experience! Build the first version of this dynamic resume using the how to write a resume section.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free resume template and free sample resume page.
Confirm with those around you
Review and update your competencies by checking with colleagues, friends and family. This is a clever form of advertising yourself; without being obvious one makes it known how you have grown in skills and competencies. People know what to come to you for and feel more comfortable with the fact that you can get the job done, because they have seen your resume. Ask these people for advice and input on your resume and what you should add to it.
One also gains automatic input into future decisions based on the direction your resume makes clear your career seems to be taking. People love to give advice, seek this advice and inform them without them thinking you are being untoward. Always remember to say thank you to them. Even consider including them in your resume as a thank you for an insight gained from them; always ask their permission first. Build your resume into a format that can be easily updated using the input of other people; use our how to write a resume section tips and techniques.
Use your resume to inform those around you
Remember to frame the conversation before you ask for input. Not framing a conversation can have negative effects. Through asking and giving input one informs all those working with you. Identify the individuals you think would benefit from being better informed on matters concerning you and your skills. Ask their input on your resume. The effect of informing is of huge advantage to you, the process of asking for input is a natural and non-invasive method of informing. Use this method of asking input in everyday career building. People love to give their input. Use the resume writing tips we discuss in the how to write a resume section to build a working resume.
Use groups and forums to measure your progress
A very effective way to use the Continuous Resume process is within a group. Your team at work could use the Continuous Resume process to stay informed of the entire team member’s growth in skills and competencies. The group can challenge one another on different aspects which might require some more focus. All will be aware of one another’s progress over that period of time creating a compelling event for all to look forward to and develop ones resume toward that group meeting. If you need help writing your resume, go through our how to write a resume section. If you cannot find a resume writing solution there, please contact one of our experts.
Plan your future actions
From these group resume processes certain actions steps to take will develop; actions toward the development of your resume. Test with the group which future actions would best fit the direction your career is taking.

Welcome to the how to write a resume page, a step by step process for building your resume as well as free resume samples to get you started.

Career Builder has worked through in excess of four thousand resumes and cover letters over the past ten years. We have recruited more than five hundred people in our own companies as well as many other companies.

There are many ways one can use a resume to build a career, other than landing a job. Use our Working Resume process to inform those around you and shape your career. We share these processes with you; help us develop them further by telling us how you used them and what happened.

working resume

Write Your Working Resume

On Career Builder you will find tested ways to develop your career using your resume, as well as straightforward guidelines on what recruiters are looking for in a resume and what information a cover letter could contain. Before you start building your resume, you have to Get this free report!

The first section of this page consists of how to write a resume, the second part consists of a process we have developed and used in our own companies, the continuous Resume® process. Use our resume writing tips to build a working resume. If you need more examples visit our free sample resume page.

This page covers the following:

How to write a resume

How to write a resume the way the interviewer prefers it and resume writing tips

Working Resume

Use this process to inform others and build your career

The mind of the interviewer

Know what the interviewer will focus on before the interview and when writing your resume

How to write a resume

When writing a resume one wants a whole library of words describing the unique individual that is you. We recommend you do a few self discovery exercises to get information on how you do your best work and how to best describe yourself to the interviewer.

Remember the interviewer wants to get to know you and how you made choices in the past. Here are two such exercises to get you started:

Here is a chronological order on how to write a resume. Most recruiters expect a resume format similar to this:

  1. Personal details
  2. Resume cover letter
  3. Detail on your high school years
  4. Detail on your tertiary education
  5. Summary-map of your skills
  6. Summary-map of your job experience
  7. More specific job information
    • Starting with your most recent job
    • Second last
    • Third last
    • Etc.
  8. Remuneration
  9. Resume reference page
Resume writing is a great opportunity to talk about you. Go with your personal gut feeling on how to make your resume flow. Remember to keep the focus on you and the choices you made in your career, why you made those choices and what you learned from them. Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.

Personal details

Include the normal personal details in your resume. Include everything the recruiter might need to get in contact with you, for example a mobile number as well as a number for a land line.
In our how to write a resume section we do not include a list of all the specific personal details required. Go through our free sample resume page to get an idea of what is expected. Include all personal information that is necessary; be careful to include too much detail.
The resume is about you and your choices; be wary to do damage to your resume by placing too much focus on other information contained in your resume. As we said earlier, we do not include a detailed list in the how to write a resume section, visit our free resume templates and free sample resume page for examples on detailed personal details.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.

Resume cover letter

Most recruiters expect a resume cover letter at this position in the chronological order of your resume, not necessarily before the resume itself. A cover letter’s job is to briefly introduce your resume and then answer the following questions:
  • I apply for this job opening because…
  • I believe I can do this job because…
  • I want this job because…
You can have two approaches in writing your resume cover letter. The first cover letter approach is one focused on the company and the specific job opening. Shape your cover letter to fit the requirements of the job opening. We do not build on this strategy much in our how to write a resume information, recruiters prefer the second option…
The second approach is to write a general cover letter. This cover letter is focused on you and your achievements, your major choices in life and how they fit with the career opportunity presenting itself. Most recruiters prefer the second option. It is perceived as more natural and they get to know you as an individual.
In how to write a resume, we use the second option throughout our guidelines on resumes. Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.

Details on your high school years

In your resume one will include the normal high school detail. For example:
  • Where did you finish high school?
  • Which subjects did you have in your last year?
  • What were your symbols?
    • Include your symbols here as well, even though it is on your school certificate. It makes reading your resume easier for the recruiter.
  • Which sport did you do in school?
  • Which extracurricular activities did you participate in?
You have now given a summary of your last year of school. Now let’s drill into this information a bit, for the benefit of the recruiter reading your resume. Remember recruiters want to get to know you. The central theme of your resume should be the choices you made in your life. This is the biggest indication of who you are and how you will or won’t fit with the career opportunity presented. For this kind of drilling down information gathering ask yourself questions like:
  • Why did I select the subjects I did in school?
  • Which subjects did you enjoy and which subjects did you not enjoy?
  • Why did you enjoy the subjects you did?
  • Why did you not enjoy the other subjects?
  • Why did I choose to take part in sport?
  • Which sport did I enjoy and which not?
  • Why did I enjoy certain sports and other not?
  • Was I captaining my team?
  • If you were a leader of some kind, how did it come about and did you enjoy it or not and why?
Ask the same questions about your extracurricular activities. Note that the questions we have listed we use frequently in our how to write a resume process and resume coaching, if you wish to expand a bit on these questions feel free to do so. Let us know which questions worked for you.
If you need more help writing your resume contact one of our experts. Keep your resume focused on who you are and the choices you made, why you made them and what you learned from them.
Recruiters want to get to know you as an individual, understanding the choices you made can assist them in making a more informed decision. How to write a resume gives you the tools to build a resume that talks to recruiters.
Being thorough in your presentation of self puts you leagues ahead of the rest! Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume.
If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.

Detail on your tertiary education

Do a few self discovery exercises to get words describing you, these words will assist you when compiling your resume.
In your resume one will include the normal tertiary education detail. For example:
  • Which university did you go to?
  • Which subjects did you have?
  • What were your symbols?
    • Include your symbols here as well, even though it is on your degree. It makes reading your resume easier for the recruiter.
  • Which sport did you take part in?
  • What else did you do at university?
You have now given a summary of your tertiary education. Now let’s drill into this information a bit for the benefit of the recruiter reading your resume. Remember recruiters want to get to know you. The central theme of your resume should be the choices you made in your life; this is our focus on how to write a resume, telling the recruiter your story. Your choices are the biggest indication of who you are and how you will or won’t fit with the career opportunity presented. For this kind of drilling down information gathering ask yourself questions like:
  • Why did I choose the direction I did?
  • Which subjects did you enjoy and which subjects did you not enjoy?
  • Why did you enjoy the subjects you did?
  • Why did you not enjoy the other subjects?
  • Why did I choose to take part in sport?
  • Why did I enjoy certain sports and others not?
  • Was I captaining my team?
  • If you were a leader of some kind, how did it come about and did you enjoy it or not and why?
Ask the same questions concerning your other activities at university.
Keep your resume focused on who you are and the choices you made, why you made them and what you learned from them. Recruiters want to get to know you as an individual, understanding the choices you made can assist them in making a more informed choice. Being thorough in your presentation of self puts you leagues ahead of the rest!
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.

Summary map of your skills

Add the summary map of your skills to your resume for the benefit of the recruiter and yourself. This map contains a quick summary of the skills you have acquired over the years, making it easy for the recruiter to form an overall idea of what your skills are and what you have been focusing on in your previous endeavors.
On how to write a resume we use the following example of what a summary map of one’s career competencies might look like:
What is the specific competency? Years Level of expertis
(1 = beginner 5 = expert)
Other
How to write a resume that works for you will ultimately be shaped by your career direction and the choices you made in your life. Add more columns or remove some to fit the kind of summary of your skills you would like to present in your resume. Keep in mind the purpose of the skills table is to present the recruiter with a quick summary of where you have spent your time in growing your career competencies.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.

Summary map of your job experience

If you have had an extensive career history it is worth it to give a summary map of what you have done; starting with your most recent position. This map contains a quick summary of the different jobs you have had, the duration, what you did and what you learned. Make it easy for the recruiter to form an overall picture of your career path. On how to write a resume we use the following example of what a summary map of one’s career path might look like:
What was the job description? Years Expertise gained Other

How to write a resume that works for you will ultimately be shaped by your career direction and the choices you make in your life. Add more columns or remove some to fit the kind of summary of the career path you have followed and want to present in your resume. Keep in mind the purpose of the summary table is to present the recruiter with a quick summary of where you have spent your time in growing which career competencies.

Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.


More specific job experience

Following the brief resume summaries are more detailed information on each specific job. Begin with your most recent job and work back from there. Here is the most important information recruiters expect in a complete resume:
Answer the following questions:
  • Give a quick summary of the specific position you held.
  • Where were you employed, with which company, country etc.?
  • For what period of time and which calendar year or years were you employed here?
  • What was expected of you, what was your job description?
  • Include major projects you were part of during your employment with this company.
    • This is very important! Do not just state what was expected, state what you achieved and be specific.
    • For example if you were supposed to drink two cups of coffee for the project and you drank three, mention it. Give a summary of why you achieved this. Again focus on the choices you made and why. Tell the recruiter what you learned from this experience. Give all the necessary information relating to your skills and decision making.
    • List all your major achievements concerning this position.
  • Give your reasons for wanting to leave your current position.
  • Stay away from “to be discussed”, it reflects badly on your relationship with your current employer; if you cannot discuss this what does it say? Be careful to leave space for interpretation by the recruiter. State the facts.
  • What was your remuneration on leaving?
    • Be open about this, stay away from “available on request”. Recruiters want this information to be there.
  • Ask the same questions for your second job, third job and etc.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.

Remuneration

If you have a specific expectation, state it as such. Make it clear that you are open for discussion on the subject if what you expect is not a cast in stone.

Resume reference page

On your resume reference page give a list of your major achievements rather than a complete list of all the one day courses you have ever done. A comprehensive, tedious list detracts rather than adds to your resume. It might seem as if you consider going on the course more important than applying the knowledge.
Include achievements that fit the flow of your resume, relating to specific courses; give detail that add to the choices you have made in your career up to date. Refer to other less important courses where applicable in the body of your resume, say something like “I went on this course to learn more about a specific challenge I faced, I used this knowledge to achieve this”.
When compiling the other how to write a resume sections you will find a place where you can fit course details like this. Supply a reference for every job.
If you say that a reference is available on request, it could mean you were not able to manage the relationship with that specific employer. Supply adequate contact details for every person on the list. If for whatever reason you do not feel comfortable including an individuals details; rather don’t include that reference in your resume reference page.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free sample resume page.

Get into the mind of the interviewer

It is also important to understand what the interviewer wants! We have used hundreds of books to help refine our interviewing skills over the years. The book we have gained the most from is Hiring the Best by Martin Yate.

From Michael Page we have the top 10 interview questions:

  1. Tell me about yourself.
  2. What have your achievements been to date?
  3. Are you happy with your career-to-date?
  4. What is the most difficult situation you have had to face and how did you tackle it?
  5. What do you like about your present job?
  6. What do you dislike about your present job?
  7. What are your strengths?
  8. What is your greatest weakness?
  9. Why do you want to leave your current employer?
  10. Why have you applied for this particular job?

Other resources:

Working Resume

At Career Builder we apply the Working Resume process in an ongoing basis (no pun intended :-). This process was forged in the fire of building real careers in our own companies as well as those of others. Freely apply these processes in your career. Many processes were developed to assist with Working Resume. Some have been published; others are still in the process of being compiled for publishing. We share these remarkable career developing processes with you and hope to exchange value with you. Make them your own.
We will refine the processes more within the coming weeks and months. Apply the Working Resume process while building your resume; use the guidelines in our how to write a resume section.

The Working Resume process:

Frame the conversation

Using the Continuous Resume process within your current job might seem as if you are looking for another job. This might be true or not. In both cases remember to frame the conversation. Say something like, “I discovered this Continuous Resume process on the internet; what do you think of it and will it be possible to implement this process in the company and team?”. Framing a conversation before you rush into detail will set the stage for high-quality information to flow.

Review and update your resume constantly

Your resume should grow and develop as you develop your career skills and competencies. One’s resume should not only become a priority once you start looking for a job. It is an amazing tool! One can use it to inform others of one’s growth.
Use it to measure yourself and check if you are where you planned to be. It could be a compelling event for you, updating your resume every three months and observing your personal growth, or comfort zone. Then decide what to do about the facts you gathered from updating your resume. Using this information you are able to start planning future actions; the next time a resume update is due, it will be a positive experience! Build the first version of this dynamic resume using the how to write a resume section.
Our how to write a resume section includes all the information you will need to write a working resume. If you want more examples go to our free resume template and free sample resume page.

Confirm with those around you

Review and update your skills by checking with colleagues, friends and family. This is a clever form of advertising yourself; without being obvious you make it known how you have grown. People know what to expect from you and feel more comfortable with the fact that you can get the job done, since they are part of your resume process. Ask these people for advice and input on your resume and what you should add to it.
You also gain automatic input in future decisions based on your decisions. Your resume makes clear which direction your career is taking. People love to give advice, seek this advice and inform them without being untoward. Always remember to thank them. Even consider including them in your resume as a thank you for an insight gained; always ask their permission first. Build your resume into a format that can be easily updated using the input of other people; use our how to write a resume section tips and techniques.

Use your resume to inform those around you

Remember to frame the conversation before you ask for input. Not framing a conversation can have negative effects. Through asking and giving input one informs all those working with you. Identify the individuals you think would benefit from being better informed on matters concerning you and your skills. Ask their input on your resume. The effect of informing is of huge advantage to you, the process of asking for input is a natural and non-invasive method of informing. Use this method of asking input in everyday career building. People love to give their input. Use the resume writing tips we discuss in the how to write a resume section to build a working resume.

Use groups and forums to measure your progress

A very effective way to use the Continuous Resume process is within a group. Your team at work could use the Continuous Resume process to stay informed of the entire team’s growth. The group can challenge one another on different aspects which might require some more focus. Everyone will be aware of one another’s progress over a period of time, creating a compelling event to look forward to.  Develop your resume toward that group meeting. If you need help writing your resume, go through our how to write a resume section. If you cannot find a resume writing solution there, please contact one of our experts.

Plan your future actions

From these group resume processes certain action steps will surface; actions toward the development of your resume. Test with the group which future actions would best fit the direction your career is taking.