Team Member

Career councelling traps
Beware of falling into unintentional communication and perception traps
Chapter 8 p.5
During my recent assessment interview, my team leader referred to a blunder I made three months ago. Though I learnt a lot from that mistake and never made it again, I feel that his perception of me has remained stuck on that incident. How can I persuade him that his idea of my competency is wrong?
It appears as though your team leader stepped into a career counseling trap called a “splodge”.
In our every day dealings with others, especially with regard to performance management, we should beware of falling into certain unintentional communication and perception traps.
Could you explain some of those counseling traps?
Contrast effect
Rating a team member against other team members, rather than against the criteria of identified Key Results Areas. Ratings should be based on the expectations the evaluator communicated to the team member when reviewing Key Results Areas criteria at the beginning of the assignment.
First impression / Latest behavior effect
A tendency to make an early positive or negative judgement of the team member and then to ignore or distort additional information. Ratings must be based on performance throughout the appraisal period rather than on initial or most recent impressions.
Halo / Horn effect
Generalizing one aspect of the team member’s performance to other aspects of his or her performance. This may result in an inaccurate results assessment.
Similar to self effect
Judging in favour of those team members who are seen as similar to the evaluator.
Central tendency effect
Consistently rating a team member as average rather than making the effort to give valid ratings. Such ratings fail to distinguish good and bad performance and may delay work on areas for development.
Spill-over effect
Allowing the team member’s past performance ratings, whether good or bad, to unjustly influence the evaluator’s current ratings of team member’s performance. The Key Results Areas for the most recent period is the cornerstone.
Generalization / Third party effect
Making generalizations rather than using sentences such as: “I noticed this when you did …” This lets the team member know specifically what you mean when you are praising or coaching.
Splodges
Retaining a memory of a negative incident pertaining to the team member and allowing yourself to be influenced by it, even long after it has become irrelevant. It remains in the relationship and is like a “splodge” on a white shirt. The splodge will always be there and will accumulate until the shirt is black or it is washed.
Thank you to: HP wisdom and Chuck Bonza
Some of the concepts discussed earlier in the book such as Emotional Awareness (Elephant Behaviour) and Information, will be helpful when learning how to sidestep these traps

Beware of falling into unintentional communication and perception traps

Chapter 8 p.5

w&t_question

I Ask

During my recent assessment interview, my team leader referred to a blunder I made three months ago. Though I learnt a lot from that mistake and never made it again, I feel that his perception of me has remained stuck on that incident. How can I persuade him that his idea of my competency is wrong?

w&t_exclamation

I Answer

It appears as though your team leader stepped into a career counseling trap called a “splodge”.

In our every day dealings with others, especially with regard to performance management, we should beware of falling into certain unintentional communication and perception traps.

w&t_question

I Ask

Could you explain some of those counseling traps?

Contrast effect

Rating a team member against other team members, rather than against the criteria of identified Key Results Areas. Ratings should be based on the expectations the evaluator communicated to the team member when reviewing Key Results Areas criteria at the beginning of the assignment.

First impression / Latest behavior effect

A tendency to make an early positive or negative judgement of the team member and then to ignore or distort additional information. Ratings must be based on performance throughout the appraisal period rather than on initial or most recent impressions.

Halo / Horn effect

Generalizing one aspect of the team member’s performance to other aspects of his or her performance. This may result in an inaccurate results assessment.

Similar to self effect

Judging in favour of those team members who are seen as similar to the evaluator.

Central tendency effect

Consistently rating a team member as average rather than making the effort to give valid ratings. Such ratings fail to distinguish good and bad performance and may delay work on areas for development.

Spill-over effect

Allowing the team member’s past performance ratings, whether good or bad, to unjustly influence the evaluator’s current ratings of team member’s performance. The Key Results Areas for the most recent period is the cornerstone.

Generalization / Third party effect

Making generalizations rather than using sentences such as: “I noticed this when you did …” This lets the team member know specifically what you mean when you are praising or coaching.

Splodges

Retaining a memory of a negative incident pertaining to the team member and allowing yourself to be influenced by it, even long after it has become irrelevant. It remains in the relationship and is like a “splodge” on a white shirt. The splodge will always be there and will accumulate until the shirt is black or it is washed.

Thank you to: HP wisdom and Chuck Bonza

w&t_elephant

I Advise

Some of the concepts discussed earlier in the book such as Emotional Awareness (Elephant Behavior) will be helpful when learning how to sidestep these traps.

Purpose of the Career Development Guide
Chapter 1 p.3
What is the Walk & Talk process and what does it aim to achieve?
In our journey through life each of us seeks opportunities to take stock of who we are and where we are going.
The Walk & Talk process is a structured and coordinated process intended to lead the individual through a journey of discovery and personal development in the business and career environment.
Not only does this process assist you in the development of your knowledge, skills and self-awareness, but it should enable you to increase your contribution in the playing field called BUSINESS. It strives to grow your insight into what you can do differently as a team member, as an employee and for your customers in the quest to enhance your efficiency, effectiveness and value add.
Fundamentally, a business strives to build a successful company through successful team members with satisfied customers.
From that basic objective, it follows that there are THREE important role players in the business, each with different requirements whose interests need to be met and satisfied.
You, the individual
The company
Your customers
The company’s success will be measured in the final analysis by the financial returns which it delivers to all its stakeholders (including you).
This will depend on the degree of “overlap” of interests (also known as the Economic Value Add) which can be achieved amongst the three role players. The Walk & Talk process focuses on growing the individual in order to extend this overlap for maximum mutual benefit.
While keeping in mind to satisfy the differing needs of our three main role players…
Let the journey begin!

Chapter 1 p.3

w&t_question

I Ask

What is the Walk & Talk process and what does it aim to achieve?

w&t_exclamation

I Answer

In our journey through life each of us seeks opportunities to take stock of who we are and where we are going.

The Walk & Talk process is a structured and coordinated process intended to lead the individual through a journey of discovery and personal development in the business and career environment.

Not only does this process assist you in the development of your knowledge, skills and self-awareness, but it should enable you to increase your contribution in the playing field called BUSINESS. It strives to grow your insight into what you can do differently as a team member, as an employee and for your customers in the quest to enhance your efficiency, effectiveness and value add.

Fundamentally, a business strives to build a successful company through successful team members with satisfied customers.

From that basic objective, it follows that there are THREE important role players in the business, each with different requirements whose interests need to be met and satisfied.

w&t_ch1_a_three_circless

You, the individual

The company

Your customers

The company’s success will be measured in the final analysis by the financial returns which it delivers to all its stakeholders (including you).

This will depend on the degree of “overlap” of interests (also known as the Economic Value Add) which can be achieved amongst the three role players. The Walk & Talk process focuses on growing the individual in order to extend this overlap for maximum mutual benefit.

w&t_elephant

I Advise

While keeping in mind to satisfy the differing needs of our three main role players…

Let the journey begin!

Active and Passive listening skills
Chapter 5
p.10
People often say that I’m not a good listener. The other day a team member said that I don’t hear what he is saying and that I should brush up on my “Active listening skills”. I don’t know what he meant.
Can you give me some guidelines?
Effective listening skills are of crucial importance in business, especially if you want to hear beyond what a customer is saying. It is important to understand the difference between “Passive Listening” and “Active Listening”, for both encompass a set of skills you need in order to be effective in your communication with colleagues and customers.
Passive listening techniques focus on keeping the communication flowing. It encourages the speaker to “open up”.
Passive listening:
Pay attention to the speaker.
Avoid judgmental or defensive responses.
Exert mild pressure on the speaker to keep on talking, explaining and elaborating.
Create the space the speaker needs to verbalize his real needs, opinion or doubts.
Acknowledgement:
Can simply be done by nodding the head and leaning forward, or through the use of expressions like:
“I see”
“Yes…”
“Hmm…”
“Really”, etc.
Avoid evaluative acknowledgments like:
“That’s good!”
“Excellent!”
“Your right.”,etc.
Door openers:
Door openers are responses from the listener that encourage the speaker to open up to talk about their needs, expectations, concerns, doubts and fears:
“Tell me more about that..”
“Help me to understand what you are saying regarding…”
“I’m interested to hear what you think of…”
“I’d like to hear what you feel about…”
“I’d like to hear what you are saying about…”
Listening is not about keeping quiet, it’s about getting involved in what the speaker is saying and facilitating additional communication.
And what about Active Listening?
Active Listening is about ensuring that the receiver in the communication decodes the message transmitted by the sender correctly. Active listening closes the loop in communication, providing feedback to the sender.
The active listener verbally shares impressions or understanding with the sender by paraphrasing back perceptions of the message.
The following phrases may be used when you want to check your understanding and you wish to create the opportunity for the sender to correct you if you have missed the point, or to elaborate further on the sender’s needs, expectations, doubts, etc.
When you are certain you understand what has been said:
“What I hear you saying is…”
“From your point of view…”
“I’m picking up that you…”
“As you see it…”
“What I really hear you saying, is that…”
“It seems to you…”
“You feel…”
When you are less certain that you understand, the following creates the opportunity for the sender to correct you:
“I think I hear you saying…”
“I wonder if I am correct when I say that…”
“It appears you..”
“I’m not sure I’m wrong with you but…”
“Correct me if I am wrong but…”
“Is it possible that…”
“Let me see if I understand you…”
I trust you understand what was meant by “Listening beyond what the customer is saying”.
Acting upon this information is the true key to agility in business.

Active and Passive listening skills

Chapter 5 p.10

w&t_question

I Ask

People often say that I’m not a good listener. The other day a team member said that I don’t hear what he is saying and that I should brush up on my active listening skills. I don’t know what he meant.

Can you give me some guidelines?

w&t_exclamation

I Answer

Effective listening skills are of crucial importance in business, especially if you want to hear beyond what a customer is saying. It is important to understand the difference between Passive Listening and Active Listening, for both encompass a set of skills you need in order to be effective in your communication with colleagues and customers.

w&t_binoculars

I Explain

Passive listening techniques focus on keeping the communication flowing. It encourages the speaker to open up.

Passive listening

  • Pay attention to the speaker.
  • Avoid judgmental or defensive responses.
  • Exert mild pressure on the speaker to keep on talking, explaining and elaborating.
  • Create the space the speaker needs to verbalize his real needs, opinion or doubts.

Acknowledgement

Can simply be done by nodding the head and leaning forward, or through the use of expressions like:

  • “I see”
  • “Yes…”
  • “Hmm…”
  • “Really”, etc.

Avoid evaluative acknowledgments like:

  • “That’s good!”
  • “Excellent!”
  • “Your right.”, etc.

Door openers

Door openers are responses from the listener that encourage the speaker to open up to talk about their needs, expectations, concerns, doubts and fears:

  • “Tell me more about that..”
  • “Help me to understand what you are saying regarding…”
  • “I’m interested to hear what you think of…”
  • “I’d like to hear what you feel about…”
  • “I’d like to hear what you are saying about…”
w&t_elephant

I Advise

Listening is not about keeping quiet, it’s about getting involved in what the speaker is saying and facilitating additional communication.

w&t_question

I Ask

And what about Active Listening?

w&t_exclamation

I Answer

Active Listening is about ensuring that the receiver in the communication decodes the message transmitted by the sender correctly. Active listening closes the loop in communication, providing feedback to the sender.

The active listener verbally shares impressions or understanding with the sender by paraphrasing back perceptions of the message.

w&t_ch5_o_productive-listening

The following phrases may be used when you want to check your understanding and you wish to create the opportunity for the sender to correct you if you have missed the point, or to elaborate further on the sender’s needs, expectations, doubts, etc.

When you are certain you understand what has been said:

  • “What I hear you saying is…”
  • “From your point of view…”
  • “I’m picking up that you…”
  • “As you see it…”
  • “What I really hear you saying, is that…”
  • “It seems to you…”
  • “You feel…”

When you are less certain that you understand, the following creates the opportunity for the sender to correct you:

  • “I think I hear you saying…”
  • “I wonder if I am correct when I say that…”
  • “It appears you..”
  • “I’m not sure I’m wrong with you but…”
  • “Correct me if I am wrong but…”
  • “Is it possible that…”
  • “Let me see if I understand you…”
w&t_elephant

I Advise

I trust you understand what was meant by Listening beyond what the customer is saying.

Acting upon this information is the true key to agility in business.

Effective team skills
Equip a team with effective team skills for maximum contribution
Chapter 6 p.1
You have often referred to Teams and Team Members.
What must I do to become an effective team member?
A team is composed of a number of individuals
working towards a common goal.
In the life of any team certain needs or problems crop up from
time to time. Sometimes a need for creativity arises;
issues arise that need to be resolved within the team;
different interests or points of view have to be reconciled to ensure maximum gain.
Equipping each team member with effective Team Skills will ensure maximum contribution by each member to the team process and ensure that the team adds maximum value to the customer and other stakeholders … And ultimately adds value to themselves.
Once again we present a MIND MAP to guide us on a journey through the most important principles which effective team members should master.
Remember however that an understanding of all the other skills described in this book are essential for the effective operation of teams.
Effective team skills:
The Issue Resolution model
The Six Thinking Hats
Win-Win Negotiation for maximum joint gain
Common problems with meetings
Conflict management
Creative and objective problem solving
Decision making model

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team player skills

Effective Team Player Skills

Equip team members with effective team player skills for maximum contribution

(See also: Seven habits of highly successful people)

Effective team skills

This info sheet work in a question and answer fashion. First we ask the most common question on team player skills and then provide answers with detailed explanations.

team player skills

Ask

You have often referred to Teams and Team Members.

What must I do to become an effective team member?

team member skills

Answer

A team is composed of a number of individuals working towards a common goal.

In the life of any team certain needs or problems crop up from time to time. Sometimes a need for creativity arises, issues arise that need to be resolved within the team, different interests or points of view have to be reconciled to ensure maximum gain.

effective team working skills

Effective Team Working Skills

Equipping each team member with effective team skills will ensure maximum contribution by each member to the team process and ensure that the team adds maximum value to the customer and other stakeholders … And ultimately adds value to themselves.

effective team member

Explain

We provide a list of effective team member skills below to guide you on a journey through the most important principles that effective team members should master.

An understanding of all the other skills mentioned below are essential for the effective operation of teams.

Effective team skills