Fear Of The Unknown

How to Change Careers

How can you change careers safely and securely?

Let master career change coach, Unre Visagie, show you how to approach your career change for maximum gain. People that follow the Career Maker process typically earn the same and sometimes even more after their career change. This happens because they clearly communicate the skills, resources and attititude they bring to their new job, career and company.

Watch this expert video from Master Coach, Unre Visagie below:

We are talking today about careerdevelopmentplan.net and its product: Career Maker System. This is a safe, secure, proven and now foolproof system on how to change careers. Change careers safely, securely, calmly and with a plan. The issue is the plan can only come from you. Or shall I say the content of the plan must come from you.

We have found over the years that the thing that stops most people is fear, fears are from perceptions, they are not real, they are just perceived. It’s really important to know that these fears are never real. FEAR simply stands for False Evidence Appearing Real. Fear generates perceptions of risk, huge risks, and the risks are perceived since the fears are perceived. One of the many fears is fear of the unknown and fear of failure.

Fear of failure, where FAIL is a First Attempt In Learning. During everything we’ve learnt in life, from walking, talking, bicycle riding to driving a car, we have failed, and we have learnt from this failure. The Americans in California call it very nicely failing forward. With bicycle riding you even lost some skin. What happens to people is that they feel safe in some job or career, and they perceive that change is going to mean losing that safety, instead of the view that change creates new safety. You can see it as a box that you’ve got to escape, or a prison, and all you need is the key because the key to success can only work from your hand opening the door from inside. It can never be opened from the outside.

The other way to look at this whole safe career change is to realize there’s a lot you can see up here that you cannot really touch. It’s the glass plate principle, you feel you can touch it but you bump. What you bump against is that glass plate or the box or the prison that consist of these perceptions and fears which are not real. When you look at career change, midlife career change, change at 40, it is an issue of the work you do, the job within which you do the work, the company within which you have the job, and a company is always part of an industry. If you can get this aligned to suit you, life must be very close to perfect.

We like to break into a second area where your work aligns with your job and then with your long-term career aims, and if that aim is clear it’s like a beacon you put out there. You can publish it on linkedin, you can tell your friends, you can send letters, and all the people you know who know people can send it, because you are clear. That brings us to the challenges of career change in this model that I have briefly touched on.

The first challenge is to reach this clarity, and that is why part of the process is to search for information, prepare the information, and choose where you want to be engaged: job, company, industry. Make sure it lines up with your long-term career, so that you continuously aim for your career beacon. All of us can do that.

We have achieved this with thousands; thousands in our companies, because we realized that when people have this alignment and they have sufficient new challenges their productivity jumps. We also realized that if we can get people productive quickly it is very beneficial for the company. It was very expensive to hire new people; we had to get them productive quickly. This is where these processes were born.

The processes have been honed during the last 12 years in coaching at a high end but we have engaged in a lot of pro bono work at schools, universities and communities as well. I must admit the communities were the toughest, that is where the processes really got simplified, and became foolproof. Clarity is critical. That clarity must be prepared and communicated and the alignment must be kept. Through communication you clearly engage the company and industry, you engage the teams you work with, and you communicate and engage with the people around you.

A young lady, Laura, came to me and said: “My husband says if I keep on working in this company I’ll be stupid, I must leave immediately.” I sat down with her and we went through this process, we looked at the plusses in the company and we look at the minuses in the company, we made a balance sheet. She went home and told this new story to her husband. As it turns out, she was mostly focussed on the issues and problems that she had, and as we addressed a lot of the problems, it helped clear the minuses. Afterwards they said that if you leave this job you’ll be a fool.

It is a change in perception, using the information, preparing the information, communicating the information. You will hear those three steps in many different models and guises, but it’s always just the three steps. Get hold of new information and facts, organize the information, and communicate what you’ve organized.

It’s always just three steps to maintain alignment, provided you know what you really want, what makes your eyes light up, what makes you happy to go to work so you never feel like you work a day in your life. I sometimes almost feel a bit guilty to acknowledge that for nearly 25 years I’ve been working in that space where I never felt for a moment that I am working. 20% to 30% goes into work I would like to delegate. I try to delegate since I believe if I don’t delegate I steal somebody else’s work, but you can’t always delegate so a percentage will always be tough.

You can view this alignment and clarity as overcoming the challenges which makes your fears disappear. It’s not as if you address them, by getting clarity and information the fears simply go away.

The following is an equivalent model that you can use. The purpose of your career, your career aim, your career beacon during the short term is to choose the work you do, in the job you do, for the company and the industry you want to do it in. This should align with your long-term personal wishes for earnings, career, how much you work, where you work etc. That means that strategically you keep your long-term career aim, it’s your long-term career vision and mission, almost like a company vision and mission. In the short-term your objectives and your tasks always align with your strategic plan.

That plan, just like in any company, you must be able to communicate succinctly: why and what about your career, why and what about your job, why and what about your industry and why and what about your choice. All of this is about you; you are the centre of this always. However, if you put yourself first you come last.

What is important is the service you’re going to deliver to the team around you, your company and your industry, and back home. From that service you will get your returns. Always look at what you can contribute, how you can grow what you contribute. Look at your store of goodies that you can use to be productive, that store will grow very fast. You can choose where you apply your store, who buys in your store what you offer.

We hope we’ve made it clear that a career change at any time in your life can be a safe and secure process and your fears could disappear, provided you realize you’ve got to be aligned, you address the challenges, you communicate with the people around you, your purpose of career, your career beacon and your career aim is clear. You can have a long-term plan to keep you aligned with your work, job, company and industry. I hope I will see you again down the line in our Career Maker System which is foolproof.

Career choices based on the unknown
Making career choices based on what is unknown is always a source of uncertainty for most. We fear that which we do not know. Imagine looking down a very dark tunnel running straight down into the earth. You are expected to jump into this hole, you expect this of yourself or others expect this of you. To you this hole looks like it just goes down forever, a never ending drop into a very deep abyss…
Actually the hole is only two meters deep, but you don’t know that because you only see the black opening! We are too afraid to jump into this hole simply because we know nothing of it.
Many a time it is the same with ones career choices. We are expected to make a career choice, be it a big change or a small task in our current career; it feels like we are jumping into that ‘very deep’ unknown hole. Especially with the small everyday career choices at the office, imagine having to jump into unknown holes ten times a day!
How do we usually react to such situations? We just don’t do it, we ignore it or we take forever to take action; it is just too fearful and unknown. Many a time one will miss a great opportunity, other times it was the right career choice, one will never be a hundred percent certain before making a jump.
Read the coaching session on career choices based on the unknown…
How does one overcome this fear of the unknown?
Freely use our Career Development Guide and make the information on the following pages your own, these skills and knowledge will make big and small career choices much simpler:
Emotional awareness
Signal to transform into a positive mindset
Turn all emotional experiences into selected actions
The glad game
Productive listening
Effective questioning
The decision making process
The issue resolution model
The process of transformation
The need for continuous goal clarification
Closing the feedback gap
Before we go any further, the most important fact to remember is to jump slowly! A sudden jump will almost always hurt. For example if one realizes it is time to change jobs, careers, cars, anything, do it slowly over a period of time and with the right information.
Gather the most information concerning the specific career choice one possibly can, make an informed jump .
Talk to the people around you; family, friends, colleagues, people you trust. Frame the situation you find yourself in for them and listen to what they think, but really listen and take their advice seriously; even if you think it might be senseless information at the time. One is usually very surprised at the wisdom that exists in others we share with.
Another time tested method is to write about this career choice you are facing. Write down all the questions that come to mind. Answer the ones you are able to answer, leave the others for later. Check with others, what they think would be the best answers to the questions, the ones already answered as well. Just keep on writing, anything and everything that comes to mind. It is amazing how things clear when they are out of ones head and somewhere else, there is now space for new truths to take shape. This method is equally effective for any challenging choice one might face.
Frame your mind
Continuously frame your mind for the time when one will go from information to choice to action. In more direct terms, bull%&*# your mind into taking positive action. Motivate your mind into believing that taking the action will come to success; believe it and your voice and attitude will reflect it. Think positive!
If you jump and fall a bit hard, don’t stay there too long, your muscles will start cramping! While recovering from a hard fall, take time and reflect on which choices could have been made differently and which information one did not have. Reflection is good, but not to be overused. We were built to jump and grow and run and build, ones system will recover. Get up and move.
Please share your experience at our value exchange forums and ask questions!
How does one “safely” make this jump?
Slowly. Taking action based on a choice would sometimes be faster, other times slower, never instant. At the very least apply the twenty four hour rule; especially when another person angered or frustrated you, an instant answer, remark or response is never the desired reaction. If you are angry or frustrated, allow twenty four hours to pass before you react or jump in.
A career choice with longer terms effects, for example changing careers, should be made even slower. Weeks, months could and probably should pass before making the jump. Phase into action bit by bit. Remember delegation. When changing careers, jobs, departments or positions, don’t leave gaps behind. Ensure others will be able to successfully do the job you did and you will always be welcome again!
Coaching session on Fear of the unknown career choices
Dawie
I have an opportunity to go and work with Aleph. I currently work for a company called New-World and do not know if I should change jobs. What do you think?
Nicholas
Do you enjoy your current job?
Dawie
No, I want to do graphic communication and am currently a salesman. Doing what I love doing, graphic communications, part time.
Nicholas
Why do you not want to change jobs / careers if you will do full time what you are doing part time now?
Dawie
I am not 100% certain what it is I will be doing. There is the probability that I will do some of the things I want to do, but I might have other responsibilities.
Nicholas
Would these other responsibilities be a problem to you? If some of the work would be in graphic communication? As you grow in the skill of delegation, you could always delegate more of the work you do not enjoy doing.
Dawie
No it would probably not.
Nicholas
How would you get more information on what would be expected of you in this position working with Aleph?
Dawie
I would set up a meeting with a more senior person in the company and talk to them about what it is I would be doing. Maybe talk to some other employees of the company and get a feel for how the company operates.
Nicholas
If you like what you hear and see would you then be more comfortable making a decision?
Dawie
I would get all the information I can, share this with the people around me, for example friends and family, and hear what they have to say. Once I feel comfortable that I have sufficient information and feedback to base a decisive choice on, I will take action.

Career choices based on the unknown

Making career choices based on what is unknown is always a source of uncertainty for most, especially for those considering a midlife career change. We fear that which we do not know. Imagine looking down a very dark tunnel running straight down into the earth. You are expected to jump into this hole, you expect this of yourself or others expect this of you. To you this hole looks like it just goes down forever, a never ending drop into a very deep abyss…

Actually the hole is only two meters deep, but you don’t know that because you only see the black opening! We are too afraid to jump into this hole simply because we know nothing of it.

w&t_binoculars

I Explain

Many a time it is the same with one’s career choices. We are expected to make a career choice, be it a big change or a small task in our current career; it feels like we are jumping into that ‘very deep’ unknown hole. Especially with the small everyday career choices at the office, imagine having to jump into unknown holes ten times a day!

How do we usually react to such situations? We just don’t do it, we ignore it or we take forever to take action; it is just too fearful and unknown. Many a time one will miss a great opportunity, other times it was the right career choice, one will never be a hundred percent certain before making a jump.

Read the coaching session on career choices based on the unknown…

w&t_question

I Ask

How does one overcome this fear of the unknown?

w&t_exclamation

I Answer

Use our Walk and Talk guide and make the information on the following pages your own, these skills and knowledge will make big and small career choices much simpler:

Before we go any further, the most important fact to remember is to jump slowly! A sudden jump will almost always hurt. For example if one realizes it is time to change jobs, careers, cars, anything, do it slowly over a period of time and with the right information.

Gather the most information concerning the specific career choice one possibly can, make an informed jump .

Talk to the people around you; family, friends, colleagues, people you trust. Frame the situation you find yourself in for them and listen to what they think, but really listen and take their advice seriously; even if you think it might be senseless information at the time. One is usually very surprised at the wisdom that exists in others we share with.

w&t_elephant

I Advise

Another time tested method is to write about this career choice you are facing. Write down all the questions that come to mind. Answer the ones you are able to answer, leave the others for later. Check with others, what they think would be the best answers to the questions, the ones already answered as well. Just keep on writing, anything and everything that comes to mind. It is amazing how things clear when they are out of your head and somewhere else, there is now space for new truths to take shape. This method is equally effective for any challenging choice one might face.

Frame your mind

w&t_binoculars

I Answer

Continuously frame your mind for the time when you will go from information to choice to action. In more direct terms, bulldoze your mind into taking positive action. Motivate your mind into believing that taking the action will come to success; believe it and your voice and attitude will reflect it. Think positive!

If you jump and fall a bit hard, don’t stay there too long, your muscles will start cramping! While recovering from a hard fall, take time and reflect on which choices could have been made differently and which information one did not have. Reflection is good, but not to be overused. We were built to jump and grow and run and build, your system will recover. Get up and move.

w&t_question

I Ask

How does I safely make this jump?

w&t_exclamation

I Answer

Slowly. Taking action based on a choice would sometimes be faster, other times slower, never instant. At the very least apply the twenty four hour rule; especially when another person angered or frustrated you, an instant answer, remark or response is never the desired reaction. If you are angry or frustrated, allow twenty four hours to pass before you react or jump in.

A career choice with longer terms effects, for example changing careers, should be made even slower. Weeks, months could and probably should pass before making the jump. Phase into action bit by bit. Remember delegation. When changing careers, jobs, departments or positions, don’t leave gaps behind. Ensure others will be able to successfully do the job you did and you will always be welcome again!

Coaching session on Fear of the Unknown Career Choices

Dawie

I have an opportunity to go and work with Aleph. I currently work for a company called New-World and do not know if I should change jobs. What do you think?

Nicholas

Do you enjoy your current job?

Dawie

No, I want to do graphic communication and am currently a salesman. Doing what I love doing, graphic communications, part time.

Nicholas

Why do you not want to change jobs / careers if you will do full time what you are doing part time now?

Dawie

I am not 100% certain what it is I will be doing. There is the probability that I will do some of the things I want to do, but I might have other responsibilities.

Nicholas

Would these other responsibilities be a problem to you? If some of the work would be in graphic communication? As you grow in the skill of delegation, you could always delegate more of the work you do not enjoy doing.

Dawie

No it would probably not.

Nicholas

How would you get more information on what would be expected of you in this position working with Aleph?

Dawie

I would set up a meeting with a more senior person in the company and talk to them about what it is I would be doing. Maybe talk to some other employees of the company and get a feel for how the company operates.

Nicholas

If you like what you hear and see would you then be more comfortable making a decision?

Dawie

I would get all the information I can, share this with the people around me, for example friends and family, and hear what they have to say. Once I feel comfortable that I have sufficient information and feedback to base a decisive choice on, I will take action.