Delegation

Case study from Barry du Plessis
Why delegation?
Barry’s workload increased to the point that he could no longer manage the number of projects. As a team they identified the need to delegate.
Which individual career would benefit the most?
Elsabie was identified as the person to whom they would entrust a number of projects. She was presently functioning as a PA. She had experience in customer care but had no formal project planning knowledge or experience.
She was identified because she was someone who could grow from this opportunity. Her current workload could be rearranged with others to afford her the time availability. She had the potential to succeed.
What to delegate?
Barry identified those projects that he could assign to Elsabie that he did not need to be directly involved in.
How to delegate?
The following process of situational coaching took place between Barry and Elsabie:
Directing: Structure, close supervision, clarification of understanding
Delegatee has low competence, high motivation
Barry and Elsabie had an initial meeting in which the specific responsibilities Elsabie would be handling were detailed. The success parameters were also identified. In other words it was clearly outlined what the project would look like when it was completed and successful.
Barry and Elsabie initially met daily and on occasion bi-daily to discuss her progress. For these meetings Elsabie was required to bring five questions. The questions had to be written and there had to be five. This was hard for Elsabie at first but Barry refused to engage with her until she had got into this habit. In this way only the issues relevant to where Elsabie was at her stage of development and knowledge required were addressed.
Barry dealt with these questions mainly by asking further questions! He also asked questions that made her aware of possible issues she may not have thought of that she needed to address at that stage. Barry’s meetings with Elsabie were an investment of his time but he was motivated by the longer term value of Elsabie’s role in managing projects in the company. They also were innovative in finding time, sometimes talking while doing gym at the office gym, or telephonically, or via email.
Coaching: Some directing and some supporting
Delegatee has some competence, some motivation
Barry and Elsabie continued the method of using Elsabie’s five questions to guide their discussions. The number of their meetings decreased however, over the months, as she gained confidence and competence. They began to meet two or three times a week rather than daily.
Supporting: Listening and giving positive feedback
Delegatee has increased competence, sometimes lacks confidence
Elsabie began running with the projects. She began moving in the direction of the success parameters set for her. She increased her value to the company step by step. She would still occasionally phone Barry and ask some questions. He would occasionally check in to see how she was doing.
Delegating: Task is being handled on a day to day basis by delegatee
Delegatee has high competence and high motivation.
Over a period of four to five years Elsabie increased her earnings from R60 000 pa to R280 000 pa. She was promoted to the position of Senior Project Manager. Every now and again she will give Barry call as he remains a resource for her, but this happens rarely.
Read more on delegation
Read a coaching session

Case study from Barry du Plessis

Why delegation?

Barry’s workload increased to the point that he could no longer manage the number of projects. As a team they identified the need to delegate.

Which individual career would benefit the most?

Elsabie was identified as the person to whom they would entrust a number of projects. She was presently functioning as a PA. She had experience in customer care but had no formal project planning knowledge or experience.

She was identified because she was someone who could grow from this opportunity. Her current workload could be rearranged with others to afford her the time availability. She had the potential to succeed.

What to delegate?

Barry identified those projects that he could assign to Elsabie that he did not need to be directly involved in.

How to delegate?

The following process of situational coaching took place between Barry and Elsabie:

Directing: Structure, close supervision, clarification of understanding

Delegatee has low competence, high motivation

Barry and Elsabie had an initial meeting in which the specific responsibilities Elsabie would be handling were detailed. The success parameters were also identified. In other words it was clearly outlined what the project would look like when it was completed and successful.

Barry and Elsabie initially met daily and on occasion bi-daily to discuss her progress. For these meetings Elsabie was required to bring five questions. The questions had to be written and there had to be five. This was hard for Elsabie at first but Barry refused to engage with her until she had got into this habit. In this way only the issues relevant to where Elsabie was at her stage of development and knowledge required were addressed.

Barry dealt with these questions mainly by asking further questions! He also asked questions that made her aware of possible issues she may not have thought of that she needed to address at that stage. Barry’s meetings with Elsabie were an investment of his time but he was motivated by the longer term value of Elsabie’s role in managing projects in the company. They also were innovative in finding time, sometimes talking while doing gym at the office gym, or telephonically, or via email.

Coaching: Some directing and some supporting

Delegatee has some competence, some motivation

Barry and Elsabie continued the method of using Elsabie’s five questions to guide their discussions. The number of their meetings decreased however, over the months, as she gained confidence and competence. They began to meet two or three times a week rather than daily.

Supporting: Listening and giving positive feedback

Delegatee has increased competence, sometimes lacks confidence

Elsabie began running with the projects. She began moving in the direction of the success parameters set for her. She increased her value to the company step by step. She would still occasionally phone Barry and ask some questions. He would occasionally check in to see how she was doing.

Delegating: Task is being handled on a day to day basis by delegatee

Delegatee has high competence and high motivation

Over a period of four to five years Elsabie increased her earnings from R60 000 pa to R280 000 pa. She was promoted to the position of Senior Project Manager. Every now and again she will give Barry call as he remains a resource for her, but this happens rarely.

Read more on delegation

Read a coaching session

What is meant by delegation?
Why delegation is important
Every person has unique and valuable qualities that are for the benefit of the world. When we entrust responsibly we allow those qualities to flourish.
Our team’s capacity and abilities expand as we increase each other’s skills and experience.
Stephen Covey (7 Habits of Highly Effective people) says, “Trust is the highest form of motivation.” Delegation entrusts people with tasks deemed important – this can motivate and energize your team.
Why we do not entrust others with our work
“It would be quicker to do it myself” – short term view
“I don’t have anyone I can trust to delegate it to” – short term view: training required
“I can do it better myself” – perfectionist view
“If that’s what I am told to do that’s what I do.” – abdicating
“I don’t know how to delegate.” – abdicating: personal training required
When to delegate
When your diary is full (i.e. at least 60% scheduled) of right actions.
Organize your diary by asking key questions:
What am I doing now that doesn’t’t need to be done at all?
What am I doing that could be done by someone else?
What am I doing now that only I can do?
What to hand over
We keep what we are passionate about and what only we can do.
Who would gain the most if they were given responsibility
Someone who can grow and is available.
Someone who is competent, whose job it is and who has time or must make time.
Someone who you want to learn from – exchange in value exchange transaction.
How to delegate to someone you want to train
Situational Coaching
Process relative to task and relationship. Delegation therefore involves balancing directive and supportive functions.
The process of delegation begins with DIRECTING.
The person to whom the task has been entrusted with has low competence but is highly motivated to learn and grow from the experience as it increases their skills and responsibility in the company.
Directing involves close accompaniment with the delegatee, being specific about expectations, identifying measurable outcomes, clarifying understanding.
The next step involves COACHING.
At this stage the delegatee has some competence and some confidence but still needs some directing and some support. The process will involve asking questions, getting feedback and offering guidance.
The next stage involves SUPPORTING.
The individual has reached the stage of greater competence and is on the whole managing the task well. There may however be some lack of confidence when it comes to unexpected situations and new information. The person may make mistakes, need reassurance, and require problem solving skills. The delegating role will be supportive by listening and encouraging and giving specific and helpful feedback.
The final stage is that of actually DELEGATING.
At this stage the delegatee is not only competent but confident. They are managing the task well on a day to day basis with only the occasional monitoring.
Reflective coaching
As delegation moves through this process the task of the delegator is to guide the growth of the delegatee’s self concept through goal-directed behavior. This involves the following:
Setting mutually agreed goals starting with something relatively simple and as progress moving towards more complex goals.
As each goal is achieved reflecting on the process that led to this achievement. I t also asks where the gaps are in achieving the next goal and how these gaps are going to be bridged.
The reflection process will involve honest self-analysis and self-evaluation.
Through achieving goals and reflecting on the process the delegatee grows in their concept of self.
Keep the monkey on their back
Don’t take the entrusted tasks back.
Don’t rescue them.
Turn issues back to them by asking: “What are you going to do?”
Ask questions like: “What do you suggest?”
“What are the feasible alternatives?”
Case studies
Barry du Plessis’s experience with delegation
Leigh Harrison – “My failure to delegate”

What is meant by delegation?

w&t_question

I Ask

Please explain to me why delegation is important?

w&t_exclamation

I Answer

Every person has unique and valuable qualities that are for the benefit of the world. When we entrust responsibly we allow those qualities to flourish.

Our team’s capacity and abilities expand as we increase each other’s skills and experience.

Stephen Covey (7 Habits of Highly Effective people) says, “Trust is the highest form of motivation.” Delegation entrusts people with tasks deemed important – this can motivate and energize your team.

Why we do not entrust others with our work

  • “It would be quicker to do it myself.” – short term view
  • “I don’t have anyone I can trust to delegate it to.” – short term view: training required
  • “I can do it better myself.” – perfectionist view
  • “If that’s what I am told to do that’s what I’ll do.” – abdicating
  • “I don’t know how to delegate.” – abdicating: personal training required

When to delegate

  • When your diary is full (i.e. at least 60% scheduled) of right actions.
  • Organize your diary by asking key questions:
    • What am I doing now that doesn’t need to be done at all?
    • What am I doing that could be done by someone else?
    • What am I doing now that only I can do?

What to hand over

  • We keep what we are passionate about and what only we can do.

Who would gain the most if they were given responsibility

  • Someone who can grow and is available.
  • Someone who is competent, whose job it is and who has time or must make time.
  • Someone who you want to learn from – exchange in value exchange transaction.

How to delegate to someone you want to train

Situational Coaching

Process relative to task and relationship. Delegation therefore involves balancing directive and supportive functions.

  • The process of delegation begins with DIRECTING.

The person to whom the task has been entrusted with has low competence but is highly motivated to learn and grow from the experience as it increases their skills and responsibility in the company.

Directing involves close accompaniment with the delegatee, being specific about expectations, identifying measurable outcomes, clarifying understanding.

At this stage the delegatee has some competence and some confidence but still needs some directing and some support. The process will involve asking questions, getting feedback and offering guidance.

  • The next stage involves SUPPORTING.

The individual has reached the stage of greater competence and is on the whole managing the task well. There may however be some lack of confidence when it comes to unexpected situations and new information. The person may make mistakes, need reassurance, and require problem solving skills. The delegating role will be supportive by listening and encouraging and giving specific and helpful feedback.

  • The final stage is that of actually DELEGATING.

At this stage the delegatee is not only competent but confident. They are managing the task well on a day to day basis with only the occasional monitoring.

Reflective coaching

As delegation moves through this process the task of the delegator is to guide the growth of the delegatee’s self concept through goal-directed behavior. This involves the following:

  1. Setting mutually agreed upon goals starting with something relatively simple and progressing to more complex goals.
  2. Reflect on the process that led to the achievement as each goal is completed. This leads to reflection on where the gaps are in achieving the next goal and how these gaps are going to be bridged.
  3. The reflection process will involve honest self-analysis and self-evaluation.
  4. Through achieving goals and reflecting on the process the delegatee grows in their concept of self.
w&t_elephant

I Explain

Keep the monkey on their back

Don’t take the entrusted tasks back.

Don’t rescue them.

Turn issues back to them by asking: “What are you going to do?”

Ask questions like: “What do you suggest?”

“What are the feasible alternatives?”

Case studies

Barry du Plessis’s experience with delegation

Leigh Harrison – “My failure to delegate”

Case study from Leigh Harrison
Failing to delegate
I have been notoriously bad at delegation. Two situations illustrate this:
I was asked to organize a spiritual development weekend to be led by an international guest speaker. The weekend had a particular structure according to a standard format as established by the organization I was working with in the States. I was given clear guidelines on the structure and what would be required.
I did all the marketing, advertising and confirming the reservations of the participants myself. I arranged the venue, and made all the other pre-weekend arrangements.
I did organize that my sister-in-law led the times of worship which included morning devotional times as well as daily communion sessions. However, she understood that she would only provide the music and I would organize the theme and structure and lead these sessions!
Over the weekend I took on the roles of registrar, bursar, bookseller, counselor, worship leader, entertainer (I organized an evening of games and an ice-cream party for the Saturday night) and logistics co-coordinator, which included shopping for the participant’s incidentals. On top of this our guest speaker came down with a virus which slowly over the course of the weekend prevented her from speaking so I did her final day’s talk!
Needless to say by the end of the weekend I was so exhausted I myself got sick!
I was appointed regional co-coordinator in Gauteng of an organization called Christian Listeners. It was based in UK but was being established in South Africa with regions also in Cape Town and Kwazulu-Natal.
My job was to establish Christian Listeners in the region by running CL training courses that would lead to the training of CL tutors. I was part of an initial group of 10 trained by the overseas “mother” organization, of which 7 said they would continue to offer their time and resources to the growing of CL in Gauteng. Over the course of five years we ran over 40 listening courses and three tutor training events. I initiated a committee to assist in the running of the organization and I met with the other regional co-coordinators annually.
By the end of these five years there were two of us still keeping the organization going? It now no longer exists in Gauteng.
There were external factors to consider such as the fact that the kind of person required to be a CL tutor is the kind of person who is already very involved and in high demand and has little time and energy to give to another volunteer organization. Offering these courses involved a lot of preparation and traveling time as well as the course time, and time is a rare commodity in Gauteng. Various unforeseen personal events resulted in several team members leaving.
However, the bottom line is that I was not able to fulfill my mandate and this was largely due to a failure in delegating.
What I learnt
From these experiences I learnt the following:
As competent as I may be I cannot do everything myself. I need others.
Trying to do everything myself is detrimental to my health and relationships as I suffer all the symptoms of exhaustion and stress.
I need to communicate my expectations clearly, as well as negotiate well enough in advance exactly what people are prepared to do and what they understand their role to be.
Even seemingly small tasks are important and can take more time than you think, so finding someone else willing to do them is worth it.
You have to work within the priorities people have in their lives.
Failure to delegate effectively results in a lack of strength, energy and continuity in your organization.
My growth in awareness through the Aleph processes
As I have experienced the processes and mentorship guidance through ebio and Aleph I have come to a new and deeper understanding of delegation. This has impacted on my belief system and opened up a way for me to delegate with greater freedom and confidence.
There have been some fundamental shifts in my belief system and they are as follows:
I believed that if I could do it I should do it. My unconscious belief was that if I had the competency I had the job. In fact I was being lazy if I didn’t do everything the job required. This did not come from an overly developed sense of pride, although I see the pride in it now, but from a sincere belief that it was my responsibility to do everything I could to ensure the job was done well.
I now realize that not only do I have limitations I need to take into account, but that my competency does not determine everything I do, and in fact can limit the development of other people’s competency. I have realized that I have a core passion and that I when I focus my time and energy on that there are others who can grow from my competencies and passion in a way that many can contribute to a job well done.
I had a rather narrow-minded view that if I didn’t enjoy doing something it was probably something most people didn’t enjoy doing so it would be mean of me to ask someone else to do it. You may notice in this a strong martyr streak in me! Yes, I chose to do the jobs I hated because I thought no-one else would want to do them!
I now realize that God has created a wide variety of people with limitless areas of enjoyment and what I hate may be the thing someone else delights in! It truly is a celebration of the uniqueness of individuals and the differences between people in which we all compliment each other.
I believed that by delegating to someone I was burdening them. It made it very hard for me to ask anyone to do anything. I therefore always did it most apologetically giving plenty of space for the person to excuse themselves from a particular task. No wonder I got let down so often!
Working at the gym of the ebio offices has taught me that being delegated to is a joy, privilege and an opportunity. It means that another person is willing to invest in me. It means that I am being trusted with responsibility that will help me to grow and expand my skills and knowledge. I now see that by not delegating well and often I am depriving others of key learning opportunities that will allow them to find their unique expression and contribution in the world.
After my failure time and time again to delegate effectively I reached the conclusion that I could not delegate. I decided that I was just an independent worker that needed to find an environment in which I found my niche and got on with the job at hand, without having to work in a team that would involve any kind of management, leadership or delegation.
Thanks to John Maxwell and the way his ideas are integrated in the ebio processes I am learning that I can fail forwards. My failures are not an indication of an unalterable character trait but rather opportunities for me to learn and grow. It is humbling; there is no doubt about that! But if I can find the lessons then my failures have not been failures at all but stepping stones.
I am therefore making new choices to learn to delegate more effectively that I can be a more active team member, sharing my skills and competencies with others that we may all grow and get the job done effectively and joyfully
Read more on delegation
Read the coaching session

Case study from Leigh Harrison

Failing to delegate

I have been notoriously bad at delegation. Two situations illustrate this:

Situation 1

I was asked to organize a spiritual development weekend to be led by an international guest speaker. The weekend had a particular structure according to a standard format as established by the organization I was working with in the States. I was given clear guidelines on the structure and what would be required.

I did all the marketing, advertising and confirming the reservations of the participants myself. I arranged the venue, and made all the other pre-weekend arrangements.

I did organize that my sister-in-law led the times of worship which included morning devotional times as well as daily communion sessions. However, she understood that she would only provide the music and I would organize the theme and structure and lead these sessions!

Over the weekend I took on the roles of registrar, bursar, bookseller, counselor, worship leader, entertainer (I organized an evening of games and an ice-cream party for the Saturday night) and logistics co-coordinator, which included shopping for the participant’s incidentals. On top of this our guest speaker came down with a virus which slowly over the course of the weekend prevented her from speaking so I did her final day’s talk!

Needless to say by the end of the weekend I was so exhausted I myself got sick!

Situation 2

I was appointed regional co-coordinator in Gauteng of an organization called Christian Listeners. It was based in UK but was being established in South Africa with regions also in Cape Town and Kwazulu-Natal.

My job was to establish Christian Listeners in the region by running CL training courses that would lead to the training of CL tutors. I was part of an initial group of 10 trained by the overseas “mother” organization, of which 7 said they would continue to offer their time and resources to the growing of CL in Gauteng. Over the course of five years we ran over 40 listening courses and three tutor training events. I initiated a committee to assist in the running of the organization and I met with the other regional co-coordinators annually.


By the end of these five years there were two of us still keeping the organization going? It now no longer exists in Gauteng.
There were external factors to consider such as the fact that the kind of person required to be a CL tutor is the kind of person who is already very involved and in high demand and has little time and energy to give to another volunteer organization. Offering these courses involved a lot of preparation and traveling time as well as the course time, and time is a rare commodity in Gauteng. Various unforeseen personal events resulted in several team members leaving.
However, the bottom line is that I was not able to fulfill my mandate and this was largely due to a failure in delegating.

What I learnt

From these experiences I learnt the following:

  1. As competent as I may be I cannot do everything myself. I need others.
  2. Trying to do everything myself is detrimental to my health and relationships as I suffer all the symptoms of exhaustion and stress.
  3. I need to communicate my expectations clearly, as well as negotiate well enough in advance exactly what people are prepared to do and what they understand their role to be.
  4. Even seemingly small tasks are important and can take more time than you think, so finding someone else willing to do them is worth it.
  5. You have to work within the priorities people have in their lives.
  6. Failure to delegate effectively results in a lack of strength, energy and continuity in your organization.

My growth in awareness through the Aleph processes

As I have experienced the processes and mentorship guidance through ebio and Aleph I have come to a new and deeper understanding of delegation. This has impacted on my belief system and opened up a way for me to delegate with greater freedom and confidence.

There have been some fundamental shifts in my belief system and they are as follows:

  • I believed that if I could do it I should do it. My unconscious belief was that if I had the competency I had the job. In fact I was being lazy if I didn’t do everything the job required. This did not come from an overly developed sense of pride, although I see the pride in it now, but from a sincere belief that it was my responsibility to do everything I could to ensure the job was done well.
    • I now realize that not only do I have limitations I need to take into account, but that my competency does not determine everything I do, and in fact can limit the development of other people’s competency. I have realized that I have a core passion and that I when I focus my time and energy on that there are others who can grow from my competencies and passion in a way that many can contribute to a job well done.
  • I had a rather narrow-minded view that if I didn’t enjoy doing something it was probably something most people didn’t enjoy doing so it would be mean of me to ask someone else to do it. You may notice in this a strong martyr streak in me! Yes, I chose to do the jobs I hated because I thought no-one else would want to do them!
    • I now realize that God has created a wide variety of people with limitless areas of enjoyment and what I hate may be the thing someone else delights in! It truly is a celebration of the uniqueness of individuals and the differences between people in which we all compliment each other.
  • I believed that by delegating to someone I was burdening them. It made it very hard for me to ask anyone to do anything. I therefore always did it most apologetically giving plenty of space for the person to excuse themselves from a particular task. No wonder I got let down so often!
    • Working at the gym of the ebio offices has taught me that being delegated to is a joy, privilege and an opportunity. It means that another person is willing to invest in me. It means that I am being trusted with responsibility that will help me to grow and expand my skills and knowledge. I now see that by not delegating well and often I am depriving others of key learning opportunities that will allow them to find their unique expression and contribution in the world.
  • After my failure time and time again to delegate effectively I reached the conclusion that I could not delegate. I decided that I was just an independent worker that needed to find an environment in which I found my niche and got on with the job at hand, without having to work in a team that would involve any kind of management, leadership or delegation.
    • Thanks to John Maxwell and the way his ideas are integrated in the ebio processes I am learning that I can fail forwards. My failures are not an indication of an unalterable character trait but rather opportunities for me to learn and grow. It is humbling; there is no doubt about that! But if I can find the lessons then my failures have not been failures at all but stepping stones.
    • I am therefore making new choices to learn to delegate more effectively that I can be a more active team member, sharing my skills and competencies with others that we may all grow and get the job done effectively and joyfully

Read more on delegation

Read the coaching session

Find a career coach in your environment
Find a career coach with the right relationships to develop your career and expand your career choices. Career Builder identified the essential career builder skills; use them to turn any career challenge into a career growth opportunity.
When experiencing frustration or fear in your career use these emotions as opportunities to fast track your career growth; use them to pro-actively grow your career!
Find a career coach ». Career Builder assisted and is still assisting thousands of people in their career growth. We worked with more than thirty entrepreneurs and coached them through the process of building successful running companies. We are still working with this group of entrepreneurs and their companies as well as a new group of young entrepreneurs. Any successful business takes seven years to build. Career Builder coaching processes are forged in the fire of building these successful businesses and the development of the people running them; these processes are being used in many other companies as well.
We have found a few cornerstone skills to be essential in building a thriving career or business. Career Builder shares these with you before going onto our Find a Career Coach process. We discuss these skills in the form of coaching sessions on the Career Builder Coaching page and in more detail on the Actionable Career Skills page, these skills include:
Delegation
Create your own compelling events
Fear of the unknown
Pathologies
Frustration is just a trigger
Click here for the complete list…
Successful people and companies have a natural way of handling challenging situations. Career Builder observed, applied and understands this natural process.
Career Builder’s Walk and Talk method of career coaching was developed working with the best. Studying at Harvard Business School (Owner/President Management program) we came to understand the application of these processes in companies even better. Some of the Harvard Business School case studies included companies like Hewlett Packard, Volvo, Taco Bell, PepsiCo and many others. In the early seventies we were exposed to and learned from Hewlett Packard’s company processes; later this knowledge were implemented in our own companies.
We developed career coaching contracts and learned which processes worked and which did not. All these experiences with career coaching led us to the current simple set of skills we base our career coaching processes on. You can own and direct these processes to build your career. Work in a group when implementing these processes or take part in the Career Builder community forums; it always works best to implement a process with a group. The group can be directly or indirectly involved; or contact a Career Builder coach.
Where would you like to go?
Find a career coach
The difference between coaching, mentoring and councelling
Learn more about mentorship
Learn more about career councelling
At Career Builder we identified a few simple cornerstone skills we base our career coaching on. Click here for a complete list of these Career builder skills. We share these with you before going onto the Find a Career Coach process:
1. Delegate and grow
What is delegation?
Delegation is when one is able to give the work you do not enjoy doing to another who does enjoy doing that work, but you stay responsible for getting the job done on time. Successful delegation is when another person excels in their careers because they enjoy doing the work you do not enjoy doing or do not have time for. Read more on delegation…
A coaching session on delegation.
An article on delegation written by a Career Builder coach.
Read a case study on delegation:
Barry du Plessis
Leigh Harrison
2. Create your own compelling events / deadlines
Three tips to fast-track your career you can use right now:
Get a career coach by becoming a “sort of” expert in their interests and talk to them about these interests.
Find someone that loves the work you hate, delegate to them while staying responsible for this work.
When frustrated, ask yourself what is causing the frustration? Address this challenge before it explodes.
Successful company builders know that people can and should be stretched. Unre Visagie built many successful companies. He stretches the people that work with him in building these companies; people discover depths within them they never knew they had. The knowledge successful company builders have is to know when to stop expecting more from an individual and allow that specific growth curve to play itself out. The trick is that anyone wanting to grow their careers can apply this same “pressure” to themselves in building their own successful careers. Have a career builder attitude!
Read more on creating your own compelling events and learn from a coaching session on deadlines and compelling events….
3. Fear of the unknown
Making career choices based on what is unknown is always a source of uncertainty for most. We fear that which we do not know. Imagine looking down a very dark tunnel running straight down into the earth. You are expected to jump into this hole, you expect this of yourself or others expect this of you. To you this hole looks like it just goes down forever, a never ending drop into a very deep abyss…
Actually the hole is only two meters deep, but you don’t know that because you only see the black opening! We are too afraid to jump into this hole simply because we know nothing of it.
Read more on Fear of the unknown, you will also find a coaching session others learned from…
3. Find a career coach
Finding a career coach with the right relationships to develop your career and expand your choices is a simple one; it might not be quick though. One will practice engaging different people for the skills and knowledge you require from them, through being of value to them. Over time one becomes practiced and comfortable with the process of engaging experts, using the necessary skills in a natural way. If you have not yet, read through the list of skills Career Builder identified as fundamental career skills. This list matured through years of career and business building.
A good place to start is to have a broad understanding of coaching, mentoring and counseling:
Coaching
Mentoring
Counseling
When working with an expert as a mentor, be aware not to fall in the trap of counseling.
Engaging an expert person for they’re knowledge, resources and skills, there are a few skills one will use:
Emotional awareness
Signal to transform into a positive mindset
Turn all emotional experiences into selected actions
Growing a win-win mindset
Interpersonal skills through actions
Covey’s Seven Habits of highly effective people
Giving and receiving information
Responding to anger signals
Productive listening
Effective questioning
The next step
Get to know the expert’s environment. Following is a list of possible actions to take, add or remove actions that fit your unique situation.
Read about the individual in books, newspaper, magazines and on the internet.
Talk to others about the individual.
What is this person interested in, hobbies, current projects, which topics is of interest to him/her?
Strive to spend time within the circles where he or she spends time.
Through gathering this information, always try to identify places where you will be able to add value to this individual. How would be able to make a positive difference to this individuals life? For example, the expert individual you would like to work with likes to build model aircraft. You are able to acquire such models at a discounted price. You have something of value to offer!
Remember to always be professional in your approach! Build relationship in an open manner, don’t be clandestine about your dealings, you might look like a stalker!
Talk to the expert every chance you get, share with them that you would love to learn from them. Ask how they think you would be able to add value them in exchange for their time. Always have a few suggestions how you would be able to add value.
Ask for advice and practice your “expert acquiring” skills at our community forums.
Find a career coach will grow and mature over the next months. Sign up for our Career Builder Ezine if you would like to stay up to date.
The complete list of Career Builder skills:
Delegation
Deadlines or Compelling events
We fear what we do not know or understand
Pathologies
Frustration is just a trigger
Flexible and adaptive way of handling people
Work in the center, not the individual
Having an “Everybody benefits” attitude
Burnout
Stress
Motivation

Find a career coach in your environment

w&t_elephant

I Advise

Find a career coach with the right relationships to develop your career and expand your career choices. Career Builder identified the essential career builder skills; use them to turn any career challenge into a career growth opportunity.

When experiencing frustration or fear in your career use these emotions as opportunities to fast track your career growth; use them to pro-actively grow your career!

Find a career coach

Career Builder assisted and is still assisting thousands of people in their career growth. We worked with more than thirty entrepreneurs and coached them through the process of building successful running companies. We are still working with this group of entrepreneurs and their companies as well as a new group of young entrepreneurs. Any successful business takes seven years to build.

Career Builder coaching processes are forged in the fire of building these successful businesses and the development of the people running them; these processes are being used in many other companies as well.

We have found a few cornerstone skills to be essential in building a thriving career or business. Career Builder shares these with you before going onto our Find a Career Coach process. We discuss these skills in the form of coaching sessions on the Career Builder Coaching page and in more detail on the Actionable Career Skills page, these skills include:

  1. Delegation
  2. Deadlines or Compelling events
  3. We fear what we do not know or understand
  4. Pathologies
  5. Frustration is just a trigger
  6. Flexible and adaptive way of handling people
  7. Work in the center, not the individual
  8. Having an “Everybody Benefits” attitude
  9. Burnout
  10. Stress
  11. Motivation
w&t_binoculars

I Explain

Successful people and companies have a natural way of handling challenging situations. Career Builder observed, applied and understands this natural process.

Career Builder’s Walk and Talk method of career coaching was developed working with the best. Studying at Harvard Business School (Owner/President Management program) we came to understand the application of these processes in companies even better. Some of the Harvard Business School case studies included companies like Hewlett Packard, Volvo, Taco Bell, PepsiCo and many others. In the early seventies we were exposed to and learned from Hewlett Packard company processes; later this knowledge was implemented in our own companies.

We developed career coaching contracts and learned which processes worked and which did not. All these experiences with career coaching led us to the current simple set of skills we base our career coaching processes on. You can own and direct these processes to build your career. Work in a group when implementing these processes or take part in the Career Builder community forums; it always works best to implement a process with a group. The group can be directly or indirectly involved; or contact a Career Builder coach.

1. Delegate and grow

What is delegation?

Delegation is when one is able to give the work you do not enjoy doing to another who does enjoy doing that work, but you stay responsible for getting the job done on time. Successful delegation is when another person excels in their careers because they enjoy doing the work you do not enjoy doing or do not have time for. Read more on delegation

2. Create your own compelling events / deadlines

Three tips to fast-track your career you can use right now:

Successful company builders know that people can and should be stretched. Unre Visagie built many successful companies. He stretches the people that work with him in building these companies; people discover depths within them they never knew existed. The knowledge successful company builders have is to know when to stop expecting more from an individual and allow that specific growth curve to play itself out. The trick is that anyone wanting to grow their careers can apply this same “pressure” to themselves in building their own successful careers. Have a career builder attitude!
Read more on creating your own compelling events and learn from a coaching session on deadlines and compelling events….

3. Fear of the unknown

Making career choices based on what is unknown is always a source of uncertainty for most. We fear that which we do not know. Imagine looking down a very dark tunnel running straight down into the earth. You are expected to jump into this hole, you expect this of yourself or others expect this of you. To you this hole looks like it just goes down forever, a never ending drop into a very deep abyss…
Actually the hole is only two meters deep, but you don’t know that because you only see the black opening! We are too afraid to jump into this hole simply because we know nothing of it.
Read more on Fear of the unknown, you will also find a coaching session others learned from

Find a career coach

Finding a career coach with the right relationships to develop your career and expand your choices is a simple one; it might not be quick though. One will practice engaging different people for the skills and knowledge you require from them, through being of value to them. Over time one becomes practiced and comfortable with the process of engaging experts, using the necessary skills in a natural way. If you have not yet, read through the list of skills Career Builder identified as fundamental career skills. This list matured through years of career and business building.
A good place to start is to have a broad understanding of coaching, mentoring and counseling:

  • Coaching
  • Mentoring
  • Counseling

When working with an expert as a mentor, be aware not to fall in the trap of counseling.

Engaging an expert person for their knowledge, resources and skills, there are a few skills one will use:

The next step

Get to know the expert’s environment. Following is a list of possible actions to take, add or remove actions that fit your unique situation.

  • Read about the individual in books, newspaper, magazines and on the internet.
  • Talk to others about the individual.
  • What is this person interested in: hobbies, current projects, which topics is of interest to him/her?
  • Strive to spend time within the circles where he or she spends time.

Through gathering this information, always try to identify places where you will be able to add value to this individual. How would you be able to make a positive difference to this individual’s life? For example, the expert individual you would like to work with likes to build model aircraft. You are able to acquire such models at a discounted price. You have something of value to offer!

w&t_elephant

I Advise

Remember to always be professional in your approach! Build relationship in an open manner, don’t be clandestine about your dealings; you might look like a stalker!

Talk to the expert every chance you get, share with them that you would love to learn from them. Ask how they think you would be able to add value them in exchange for their time. Always have a few suggestions how you would be able to add value.

Ask for advice and practice your “expert acquiring” skills at our community forums.

Explanation of the following skills will follow shortly:

  1. Delegation
  2. Deadlines or Compelling events
  3. We fear what we do not know or understand
  4. Pathologies
  5. Frustration is just a trigger
  6. Flexible and adaptive way of handling people
  7. Work in the center, not the individual
  8. Having an “Everybody Benefits” attitude
  9. Burnout
  10. Stress
  11. Motivation