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Learn the skills to effectively manage a business or team meeting for greater results!

It is all about the meeting’s purpose and outcomes

With out the clarity you should simply say no! Learn how to say by signing up for the Career Maker system on this site.

Manage business meetings with purpose and outcomes.

Business meetings need clarity, outcomes and purpose - else say NO!

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How to manage a business or team meeting

  1. Plan the meeting
  2. Talk about and listen
  3. Proud of session
  4. Vision and mission
  5. Action road forward and direction
  6. Further engagement
  7. Techniques to increase value flow
how to manage a meeting

How to manage a meeting

Plan the meeting

  • Keep the time and logistics in mind. Structure the meeting and keep the process of organizing in line to achieve the desired outcome / outcomes.
  • Choose a congenial place and time for all individuals involved in the meeting.
  • Who can contribute to the meeting with the best benefit and fit for the specific scenario and goal of the meeting? If you wish to take another person with to the meeting, decide on someone that will fit and cause stacking. Stacking means there is more than one direct benefit to more than one individual or entity involved.
  • Clarify the objective: what do all those involved hope to get out the meeting? Ensure that the expectations of all those involved are shared and calibrated with one another.

How to talk about & listen during the meeting

  • Listen in a structured manner
  • Share in a structured manner

Use the Carnegie method of opening or re-starting a conversation when you get stuck during the meeting:

  • In your mind walk down the street in which the person you are conversing with lives, see the brass plate next to the front door: ask questions about where the individual lives or where they lived.
  • Now walk into the house in your mind’s eye: talk about and ask about what you see on the walls, like photographs, pictures, paintings, ornaments and so on.
  • On top of the house, there is an airplane: where has this person traveled or where do they wish to travel.
  • On top of the airplane is a hobbyhorse: what type of hobbies do they practice and what other interests do they have.
  • On top of the plane, on top of the hobbyhorse sits grandma knitting: where does his/her family come from and what are they engaged in.
  • Identify the feelings, positive or negative, driving the other individuals in the meeting.
  • Positive and negative feelings
    • We are driven by what we desire.
    • This desire is driven as much by positive feelings as it is driven by what we do not want.
    • Humans appear to be more capable of stating what they do not want than what they do want. We seem to struggle with stating our observations about these negative feelings, the things we do not want.
  • The Issue is
    • Continually ask yourself: “It will be right when?”. Use The Issue Is model to assist in creating clarity.
    • Part of sharing in a structured manner is to be able to lead the other individuals on discovering when something will be right.
    • Statements like “The real issue is…” and “When will this be right…?” is typical of this type of conversation.
  • Rapport and Reflection
    • Build rapport by using encouraging body language and activator statements.
    • Reflect and mirror the other person’s statements to ensure you understand what is being said or asked. For example if someone makes a statement like: “You must remember to complete the letter.” You would then mirror that statement ensuring you understood the other person: “You would like me to complete the letter to John as we discussed previously, would you like me to mail it as well or do you want to read it first?.” This ensures there are no misunderstandings and possible challenging situations.
    • Allow the other person to complete what they want to say. Build rapport by using statements like, “Tell me more”, “Wow really!?”, “Is it really like that?”, “They do that?” etc.
  • Open or re-start a conversation using the Carnegie model above (see the book by Dale Carnegie: Winning friends and Influencing people for more resources).
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  • There is basic “stuff” any person on earth feel comfortable talking about. This includes subjects like family, hobbies, travel, interest, art, music and many more such subjects. When a conversation comes to a place where the other person or people are low on energy, in other words they are struggling to communicate with you, use the Carnegie method to re-start the conversation. This process can also be used to start a conversation.

What are the other person/people proud of?

Make the other person feel important

  • What are the other person/people proud of in home, career, business and relations?
  • What does he/she believe in?
  • Religious statements are taboo. When treading in the realm of personal belief, leave the other person to talk, you just listen without reacting. Be aware of making controversial statements or attacking the others’ statements. Use these methods to get the most out of a meeting; do not allow emotional reactions to sabotage the purpose of the meeting.
  • Where does the other spend most of their time?
  • What is on their minds? Things, places and people they have on their minds the most. Such information can be helpful in framing a meeting. Be really interested without probing.

Structure the vision & mission during a meeting

Structure and frame the exploration of the meeting

  • Keep the identified goal in mind
  • What are the other people about?
  • Where are they going in life?
  • What do they wish to achieve?
  • What are their dreams and aspirations?
  • When engaging in a vision / mission type conversations remember and share stories where applicable. It could make for very interesting conversation. Be careful to never attack another person’s beliefs. Some examples include:
  • Gandhi was about dignity and he ended with freedom.
    • Gandhi wanted dignity for his people. He achieved freedom; do the people now have dignity?
  • Madiba was also about dignity and we now have democracy.
    • Madiba also wanted the people to have dignity in being productive. The people now have the vote. Does having the vote bring about dignity?
  • Kennedy caused the USA to believe they are a super race, which caused Vietnam.
    • Kennedy made America invincible by putting the first man on the moon. America believed they could not lose in Vietnam.
  • These are strong examples to use, but if you do not understand the purpose of a meeting, the outcome for your company, project or personally might be the same!

Action road forward and direction

Ask and answer questions like:

Where will you be?

What will you do?

For whom will you do it?

What will the result be?

  • What is the direction we want to go according to the information gathered from the meeting? What alternatives do we have? Develop alternatives using methods like “Asking questions”, “Strawmen” and Edward de Bono’s PO “.
  • Ask questions like:
    • “What else?”
    • “Together with?”
  • Strawmen:
    • One can create it and then burn it, no emotions or structure attached to it. Facilitate out of the box thinking.
    • One is able to develop new ideas without having to defend; there is nothing to defend because it is a Strawmen.
  • Edward de Bono’sPO:
    • Edward de Bono’s PO works in the same manner. One asks the question: “What is PO?” PO is nothing; it can thus be anything one wants it to be. It belongs to nobody and means nothing so PO can be anything you want it to be; again without having to defend it.
  • Orders first or missionary
    • If the project must have orders to sustain it then how does one go about getting orders?
    • If the project is missionary, it is an organization or individuals personal passion, who provides the resources?
  • Are the Seven risks of businesscovered?
    • Seven risks of business, which applies to any project as well.
    • Cover each of the risk areas with co-opted STORRGIES, in other words – obtain external resources that will cover the gaps identified in the project.

Further engagement

  • Conclude and agree who does what, where, when and why?
  • Determine if Venn diagram overlaps exist or not.
  • Venn diagrams
    • A Venn diagram gives a graphic representation of the different stakeholders involved in the possible project. There where the overlap between the areas exists is where you can test the possibility of further engagement and value-add.
  • Have clear next actions .
  • What is the time and place for what needs to happen next?
  • What other people must be involved?
  • Which resource needs to be added or identified?
  • What is the desired outcome of further engagement or of the actions decided upon in the meeting?

Techniques to increase value flow

Each technique you make yours will serve you for life.

  • Continuously add value using these techniques.
  • Grow and diversify communication skills .
  • Mature listening skills
  • Practiced questioning skills

Use and learn old techniques like “Feel Felt Found” to associate with and learn from.

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For a more recent detailed Mindmap summary of the seven habits click this link:

Seven habits of highly successful people

———————————————————–

The summary of implementation of the seven habits of highly effective people could be printed and view as reminder and re-inforcement.

The seven habits starts inside your mind and work outwards to the people you interact with. Remember:

  • You never require permission to do the right thing.
  • You require the seven habits and loads of skills.
  • The people from successful families get the skills at home.
  • Now all people can acquire the same success skills.

A.  Implement the habits driving your actions

  1. Take action aligned with a communicated plan and be pro-active
  2. Always align the actions with the end goal in your mind
  3. A clearly defined and communicated plan let you keep first things first

B. Implement the habits where you interact with others

  1. Grow your space to learn more, do more and earn more. Think win/win in all your interactions.
  2. Learn a lot from others and increase the access to resources and opportunities. Seek to understand others. Reflection and questioning skills.
  3. Work interactively with others to contribute more and thus gain more. Synergize and collaborate nnn

C. Keep it going and keep growing. Sharpen the saw

Please use the printable version as a reminder.

Click here to start implementing right away. Remember it all starts with your habits. You can accquire new habits in 28 days using the simple three steps to move from unconsciously aware to sub-consciously competent.

Mentoring

Mentoring

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The difference between coaching, mentoring and counseling.

(See also: key result areas)

This page explains coaching, mentoring and counseling and how to apply them in your work and personal life. We do this in a question and answer style of writing. Starting with the question, “What does mentoring mean?”

coaching counseling mentoring

Ask

Do you know what my team player skills leader said to me yesterday? He wants me to act as a mentor to one of my junior colleagues!

But how do I go about it? I’m not even sure if I know what mentoring means.

coaching mentoring

Answer

Mentoring, coaching and counseling are related concepts.

All three deal with a process of helping another person to grow and develop.

In a work environment a mentor, coach or counselor is usually a person who is experienced in the area in which the competencies of a colleague still need development.

The diagram below illustrates the three concepts and how they differ in focus.

mentoring coaching

Mentoring Coaching

Thank you to: Elizabeth Hayes

responsibilities of a mentor

Ask

Yes, but can you tell me what those same core skills are?

mentoring styles

Answer

It is essential that mentors, coaches and counselors have the following skills:

mentorship pictures

Mentorship pictured

mentoring and coaching

Explain

To be able to maximize the growth of the individual being mentored and add value to the relationship, the mentoring skills and style of the mentor should be developed and adapted to suit the developmental level and need of the individual being mentored.

mentorship process

Ask

Wait a minute, there’s still a lot I need to know!

What does it mean to adapt your mentoring style to the developmental level of the individual being mentored?

Mentorship styles (S) in relation to the Developmental level (D) of the individual being mentored

mentorship

Mentorship Process

coaching mentoring e counseling

Answer

According to Hersey and Blanchard, four developmental levels of the individual being mentored can be distinguished, ranging from D1 to D4 (as they call it).

At each level the individual being mentored needs a different monitoring style to maximize growth.

They have further identified four mentoring styles (S1 to S4) which differ from each other in terms of the amount of supportive and directive behavior each encompasses.

The diagram above illustrates what each developmental level entails, as well as the appropriate mentoring style that will facilitate the individual being mentored’s growth to the next level.

differences between coaching and mentoring

Ask

OK, so that means that my colleague , who has high commitment and low competence, is on developmental level D1 and he needs a Directing Mentoring Style. S1: a lot of structure, control and supervision.

coaching y mentoring

Advise

Remember to adapt your mentoring style as your individual being mentored moves to another development level.

mentor ship

Explain

The mentoringprocess can be regarded as the growth of the individual being mentored’s self-concept through goal directed behavior. As indicated in the diagram below, the individual being mentored is guided from one goal (G1) to a more complex one (G2). The sense of achievement leads to the enhancement of the individual being mentored’s self-concept, or sense of self-worth (S-C.1 to S-C.2)

After achieving the goal, it is vital that the mentor assists the individual being mentored to REFLECT on the achievement.

Through reflection (which implies honest feedback) self-analysis and self-evaluation, growth of the individual being mentored’s self-concept is facilitated.

mentorship model

Mentorship model

mentoring y coaching

Advise

The Performance Management Process is a very effective vehicle for setting and reviewing goals.

four levers of control

Four levers of control

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Simons Four Levers of Control

In this article you will find a question and answer style explanation of the four levers of control.

levers of control

Ask

I often hear people say that the company is on track. How do they know that? What mechanisms exist that guide the company, its people and its business to stay on track?

levers of control

Answer

As a fast growing company in an ever-changing environment your company focuses on the effective utilization of , as  R.Simons from Harvard Business School calls it, the four levers of control.

Within the company, mechanisms exist to ensure that four things happen effectively:

  1. Obtaining commitment to the purpose of the company
  2. Staking out the territory
  3. Getting the job done
  4. Positioning for tomorrow

For each aspect there is a lever of control to ensure it Stays On Track.

This diagram identifies the four levers of control and gives you a Holistic view of the dynamics of controlling strategy:

levers of control

Levers of control

simons levers of control

Ask

I can see that we are dealing with four sets of systems – the four levers – that work together to ensure that the business strategy stays on track. I recognise some of the terms, but can’t you give me practical examples that will enable me to get a better picture of what the Four Levels of Control consist of in our company.

simons levers of control

Explain

See the link with the symbols and the culture of the company? Remember the balance scorecard?

It’s a very useful diagnostic control system…and do you realise that the key result areas process is also a diagnostic control system for individual performance and career management.

Lets explore the What, Why and How of the four levers of control in the company:

LEVER 1: Belief systems

What:

Explicit sets of belief that define basic values, purpose and direction; including

Why:

To provide momentum and guidance to opportunity

  • Mission statements
  • Vision statements
  • Credos
  • Statements of purpose

LEVER 2: Boundary system

What:

Formally stated rules, limits and prescriptions tied to defined sanctions and credible threat to punishment

Why:

To allow individual creativity within defined limits of freedom

  • Codes of business conduct
  • Strategic planning systems
  • Asset acquisition systems
  • Operational systems

LEVER 3: Diagnostic control system

What:

Feedback systems that monitor organisational outcomes and correct deviations from preset standards of performance like:

Why:

  • To allow effective resource allocation
  • To define goals

How:

  • Set standards
  • Measure outputs
  • Link incentives to goal achievement

LEVER 4: Interactive control system

What:

Those systems that team player skills use to advance and develop.

Why:

  • To focus organisational attention on strategic uncertainties
  • To provoke the emergence of new initiatives and strategies
  • To ensure that the way we do business relates very closely to the changes in customer needs

How:

By ensuring that:

  • Information regarding changes in technologies, customer requirements, supplier strategy, competitors strategies and team skills are adequately and proactively incorporated into the strategy process
  • The chosen strategy remains appropriate to the business reality and overall company objectives
4 levels of control

Advise

Much of the How of Lever 4 is achieved over a cup of coffee through interaction during team discussions, and through listening to your customer…

Try some active listening and productive questioning techniques on your customer, you’ll be amazed at what you learn!

Thinking about changing careers? Read this next: What career is right for me